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The Internal Workings of the Triton OTF

Jeff Harkins Oct 24, 2013

  1. Jeff Harkins

    Jeff Harkins knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Folks have been Asking for some time for some pictures of the inside of the Triton. I finished up some renderings and drawings so I thought I would post them. Feel free to ask any questions.
    Thanks for lookin'
    Jeff
    :ross:

    There are 41 individual pieces to this knife. The top frame (1) houses the heart of the mechanism, the slide assembly (2). Within the “slide assembly” is the “main spring” (3) and harden steel “Lugs” (4), which are attached to either end. These lugs contact the blade at point (5) to shoot the blade in and out. This OTF mechanism uses what I call the “Cowcatcher” (6) for a solid lock-up. The Cowcatcher slides along a groove in the “Bottom frame” to the under cut (7) were the angles that are machined prevent movement in any direction. The “lock out lever” (8) contacts the blade at point (9) when the blade is deployed. The “lock in lever” (10) contacts the blade at point (11) to keep the blade locked in.

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
  2. gzb

    gzb SUPER Moderator* Super Moderator

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    Enlightening and fascinating at the same time Jerry.

    Now I can see how the *3D wedge* of the cowcatcher meshes with the undercut and limits blade play to virtually zero.

    Thanks for taking the time to share this... :thumbsup:
     
    Jigsawed likes this.
  3. aicdan2000

    aicdan2000 Average member

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    The engineering of these knives is equally as beautiful as the final piece of art. Truly masterful.
     
    admanthelabrat likes this.
  4. firebolt

    firebolt Hollandse Duivel Brigade Member

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    thank you for sharing,
    as i admire your knives very much, this help to understand why they stand out in a crowd
     
  5. JackBlades

    JackBlades former cerveca terminador

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    Jerry? Who is Jerry? :unintroduced:
     
  6. gzb

    gzb SUPER Moderator* Super Moderator

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    Damn. Just saw that Jack...LOL. :tard:

    Apologies to Jeff...
     
    admanthelabrat likes this.
  7. Jeff Harkins

    Jeff Harkins knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Wait a sec. ...I thought I was Jack... no Jerry...
    Awhh fergit it... something with a J...:devilzeek
     
  8. itadakimasu

    itadakimasu There are no kangaroos in Austria! JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Nice to see the internals, thanks for the thread.
     
    admanthelabrat likes this.
  9. JackBlades

    JackBlades former cerveca terminador

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    To add something constructive, :manganr: That is a marvel of machining. The pocket that "catches" the "cowcatcher" must be a bitch to get just right.
    May I ask how the mainspring is secured to the lugs?
     
  10. Jeff Harkins

    Jeff Harkins knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    The undercut is indeed a bitch. Not hard to get right, but I have to take a 203 key-cutter and modify it on a tool and cutter grinder to do it. That's not a lot of fun.
    Time consuming and expensive. Generally I get about 4 knives out of it before it breaks. 25% of the time it will embed in the frame, which then gets chucked into the cow pasture...
    And hopefully not a piece of Rados turkish.

    I got lucky on the main spring. The ID of the spring is .059", the same as a 0-80 screw. I take a 1" long 0-80 (Philips head), turn down the first .5 of the threads to .045". The OD of the spring is .093", and the whole in the lug is reamed at .093". So when I tap the lug onto the spring, and then tap in the screw into the spring with a bit of loc-tite, it spreads or expands to a press fit. The long screws also act as a spring guide. Never had one fail, and once its together it doesnt come apart. Ever.


    Sometimes the planets do align...
    Cya
     
  11. Obijuan Kenobe

    Obijuan Kenobe Our only hope! Brigade Member

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    Supremely cool to share this with us.

    obi
     
    admanthelabrat likes this.
  12. purpledc

    purpledc purple or blue, depends on the strength of your gr Brigade Member

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    a few years back I had the amazing opportunity to meet Jeff at the chicago custom knife show. He had tritons on the table at varrying stages of assembly. Not only was he one of the most humble and flat out nice makers I met that day (there were some real divas there, but jeff was eager to discuss all facets of knife talk) but his work is just as beautiful on the inside as it is on the outside.

    Its a damn shame they havent created a transparent material that could withstand the opening and closing of these knives because the impeccable detail to the internals is a crime to cover up. I was amazed that even with only half a handle and the blade with no screws holding it together there was no wiggle to the blade. It was a turning point in my collecting after that. I still had otf knives but I really didnt enjoy them after that. They all seemed like toys in comparison.
     
  13. JackBlades

    JackBlades former cerveca terminador

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    Sorry I took so long to reply.
    The way you anchor the lugs is just magic genius. I appreciate magic genius. No twisted little eyelets to create weak points, no crazy over-engineered spring "hooks" (think UT), just perfect thinking outside the box.

    I am truly impressed, and I've seen some very creative designs. Elegant simplicity is a lost art. You've obviously found some!
     
    admanthelabrat likes this.
  14. admanthelabrat

    admanthelabrat Average member

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    Fantastically Fascinating - I Learned Something

    Hi Jeff,

    I am no mechanical engineer and that being said... Thanks to your upload I can now better appreciate and understand the level of effort, artistry and love that goes into the internal workings of a Triton.

    I truly appreciate you sharing those with us and the opportunity to learn more about your knives.

    Very Sincerely,
    AdManTheLabRat
    (AHW)
     

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