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Talwar sword

kwackster Apr 25, 2020

  1. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    Recently i bought this old Indian Talwar sword, but it's not exactly my field of expertise.
    If possible i would like to know the timeframe & region that the sword was made, and if the blade could possibly be wootz steel.
    Thx in advance for any info you're willing to share, :-)

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    Specs:

    Overall length: 35.04 inch (89,0 cm)
    Blade length up to pointy handle end: 27.95 inch (71,0 cm)
    Blade thickness measured just before pointy handle end: 5.63 mm
    Blade thickness measured just before front double edge section: 5.15 mm
    Blade thickness at mid double edge section: 3.0 mm
    Measured edge angle: +/- 30 degrees inclusive, convex
    Handle looks to be plain carbon steel.
    Weight: 1135 grams
     
  2. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    Currently busy with resharpening the main edge with my worn-in 120 grit diamond file.
    It feels like i'm grinding high carbide steel, and i definitely need to use some pressure to make the file cut & remove material, otherwise it just skids over the surface.
    The remnants of the old main edge measured a slightly convex ~30 degrees inclusive, and the new main edge will be about the same.
    The blade also used to have it's swedge sharpened in the past, so i will probably redo that as well later on.

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  3. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    With the sword clamped to the table i use the diamond file with two hands.
    Already ordered a 300 grit diamond file from the Bay to refine the bevels a bit later on.
    If the new edge comes out good enough i will also clean up the blade surfaces and maybe try to obtain a new and somewhat bigger handle.

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  4. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    I'm lost on this one but does look way cool,, got me interested in the metal thou,,,being that hard to sharpen I wonder what the RC is on the blade being so hard ,,and who made it to be so hard ,,no idea how old it is ?? I'm not into swords but i do know somebody who is ,,but he's not a member of this community ,,and a pain it the ass for communicating back to me ,,,wish i could be of more help

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  5. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    Estimates so far range from the 18th century to the 19th century.
    Purely based on sharpening my estimate for the hardness would be around 63-64 HRC for the edge, and noticable lower for the false edge.
    I resharpened an old M2 hacksaw blade with a known hardness of 65-66 HRC just before i started on the sword, so i had something to compare the sword steel to.
    But i realize that i can be wrong.
     
  6. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    Finished making a new ~30 degrees inclusive convex edge with the 120 grit diamond file.
    Using a light touch and WD40 oil on the file surface produces a comparatively small burr, which will now be refined further with a 300 grit diamond file and again WD40 oil.

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  7. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    At the moment i'm fairly certain that my talwar is an actual fighting sword, not some wallhanger.
    The whole blade geometry seems to point in that direction, including a long & wide but shallow fuller on each side of the blade, which is almost impossible to see in the pictures.
    The widened tip area is called a yelman or yalman, and it seems that this could either be a false edge or a fully sharpened one.

    Based on the relatively heavy blade i think that this sword was meant to be used on horseback.

    Regarding the use of the talwar (and other Indian weapons) i have found this website to be very interesting:http://indianfight.com/

    From that website an example on how swords are sharpened in India:

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  8. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    Partial etching attempt with a bit of lemon juice, just to see if something would appear.
    It seems it did, but so far it doesn't look like any of the wootz patterns i see online.
    Click 2 x on the picture, then enlarge further.

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  9. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    The project has been on the backburner for a while, but now it's time for a few refining steps of the new convex edge.
    First with the blue side of a DMT Diafold, later followed by the red side.

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    Balibuyer likes this.
  10. kwackster

    kwackster Huge member

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    Currently busy refining the convex surfaces of the now centered edge with a DMT blue Diafold (coarse / 325 mesh / 45 micron)
    The ancient "edge" had most likely been done freehand on a stone wheel, and was neither convex nor even close to being centered (it waved irregularly from left to right)

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    Balibuyer likes this.
  11. spsgold

    spsgold Huge member JDBA Official Member

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    Excellent Work! looks like your patience are paying off, should be a beautiful piece when finished. Please keep posting your progress! :2handed:
     
    Balibuyer likes this.

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