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On this day, the daily facts thread

zorro Jul 15, 2014

  1. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1998, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves use of the drug Viagra, an oral medication that treats impotence.
    [​IMG] :cf:

    On this day in 1977, two 747 jumbo jets crash into each other on the runway at an airport in the Canary Islands, killing 582 passengers and crew members.
    :snoopy_flies: :aviator:

    In 1905, the neighbors of Thomas and Ann Farrow, shopkeepers in South London, discover their badly bludgeoned bodies in their home. Thomas was already dead, but Ann was still breathing. She died four days later without ever having regained consciousness. The brutal crime was solved using the newly developed fingerprinting technique. Only three years earlier, the first English court had admitted fingerprint evidence in a petty theft case. The Farrow case was the first time that the cutting-edge technology was used in a high-profile murder case.
    Since the cash box in which the Farrow’s stored their cash receipts was empty, it was clear to Scotland Yard investigators that robbery was the motive for the crime. One print on the box did not match the victims or any of the still-tiny file of criminal prints that Scotland Yard possessed. Fortunately, a local milkman reported seeing two young men in the vicinity of the Farrow house on the day of the murders. Soon identified as brothers Alfred and Albert Stratton, the police began interviewing their friends.
    Alfred’s girlfriend told police that he had given away his coat the day and changed the color of his shoes the day after the murders. A week later, authorities finally caught up with the Stratton brothers and fingerprinted them. Alfred’s right thumb was a perfect match for the print on the Farrow’s cash box.
    The fingerprint evidence became the prosecution’s only solid evidence when the milkman was unable to positively identify the Strattons. The defense put up expert Dr. John Garson to attack the reliability of the fingerprint evidence. But the prosecution countered with evidence that Garson had written to both the defense and prosecution on the same day offering his services to both.
    The Stratton brothers, obviously not helped by the discrediting of Garson, were convicted and hanged on May 23, 1905. Since then, fingerprint evidence has become commonplace in criminal trials and the lack of it is even used by defense attorneys.
    :mugshot:

    In 1912, in Washington, D.C., Helen Taft, wife of President William Taft, and the Viscountess Chinda, wife of the Japanese ambassador, plant two Yoshina cherry trees on the northern bank of the Potomac River, near the Jefferson Memorial. The event was held in celebration of a gift, by the Japanese government, of 3,020 cherry trees to the U.S. government.
    :treehugger2:

    On this day in 1964, the strongest earthquake in American history, measuring 8.4 on the Richter scale, slams southern Alaska, creating a deadly tsunami. Some 125 people were killed and thousands injured.
    :shakie:

    On this day in 1973, the actor Marlon Brando declines the Academy Award for Best Actor for his career-reviving performance in The Godfather. The Native American actress Sacheen Littlefeather attended the ceremony in Brando’s place, stating that the actor “very regretfully” could not accept the award, as he was protesting Hollywood’s portrayal of Native Americans in film.
    :alcapone: :how:

    In 1836, in a disastrous setback for the Texans resisting Santa Anna’s dictatorial regime, the Mexican army defeats and executes 417 Texas revolutionaries at Goliad.
    This happened 3 weeks after the Alamo, butt* you never hear about this. :vatoloco:

    The University of Oregon defeats The Ohio State University 46–33 on this day in 1939 to win the first-ever NCAA men’s basketball tournament. The Final Four, as the tournament became known, has grown exponentially in size and popularity since 1939. By 2005, college basketball had become the most popular sporting event among gamblers, after the Super Bowl. The majority of that betting takes place at tournament time, when Las Vegas, the internet and office pools around the country see action from sports enthusiasts and once-a-year gamblers alike.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    At 4 a.m. on March 28, 1979, the worst accident in the history of the U.S. nuclear power industry begins when a pressure valve in the Unit-2 reactor at Three Mile Island fails to close. Cooling water, contaminated with radiation, drained from the open valve into adjoining buildings, and the core began to dangerously overheat.
    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant was built in 1974 on a sandbar on Pennsylvania’s Susquehanna River, just 10 miles downstream from the state capitol in Harrisburg. In 1978, a second state-of-the-art reactor began operating on Three Mile Island, which was lauded for generating affordable and reliable energy in a time of energy crises.
    After the cooling water began to drain out of the broken pressure valve on the morning of March 28, 1979, emergency cooling pumps automatically went into operation. Left alone, these safety devices would have prevented the development of a larger crisis. However, human operators in the control room misread confusing and contradictory readings and shut off the emergency water system. The reactor was also shut down, but residual heat from the fission process was still being released. By early morning, the core had heated to over 4,000 degrees, just 1,000 degrees short of meltdown. In the meltdown scenario, the core melts, and deadly radiation drifts across the countryside, fatally sickening a potentially great number of people.
    As the plant operators struggled to understand what had happened, the contaminated water was releasing radioactive gases throughout the plant. The radiation levels, though not immediately life-threatening, were dangerous, and the core cooked further as the contaminated water was contained and precautions were taken to protect the operators. Shortly after 8 a.m., word of the accident leaked to the outside world. The plant’s parent company, Metropolitan Edison, downplayed the crisis and claimed that no radiation had been detected off plant grounds, but the same day inspectors detected slightly increased levels of radiation nearby as a result of the contaminated water leak. Pennsylvania Governor Dick Thornburgh considered calling an evacuation.
    Finally, at about 8 p.m., plant operators realized they needed to get water moving through the core again and restarted the pumps. The temperature began to drop, and pressure in the reactor was reduced. The reactor had come within less than an hour of a complete meltdown. More than half the core was destroyed or molten, but it had not broken its protective shell, and no radiation was escaping. The crisis was apparently over.
    Two days later, however, on March 30, a bubble of highly flammable hydrogen gas was discovered within the reactor building. The bubble of gas was created two days before when exposed core materials reacted with super-heated steam. On March 28, some of this gas had exploded, releasing a small amount of radiation into the atmosphere. At that time, plant operators had not registered the explosion, which sounded like a ventilation door closing. After the radiation leak was discovered on March 30, residents were advised to stay indoors. Experts were uncertain if the hydrogen bubble would create further meltdown or possibly a giant explosion, and as a precaution Governor Thornburgh advised “pregnant women and pre-school age children to leave the area within a five-mile radius of the Three Mile Island facility until further notice.” This led to the panic the governor had hoped to avoid; within days, more than 100,000 people had fled surrounding towns.
    On April 1, President Jimmy Carter arrived at Three Mile Island to inspect the plant. Carter, a trained nuclear engineer, had helped dismantle a damaged Canadian nuclear reactor while serving in the U.S. Navy. His visit achieved its aim of calming local residents and the nation. That afternoon, experts agreed that the hydrogen bubble was not in danger of exploding. Slowly, the hydrogen was bled from the system as the reactor cooled.
    At the height of the crisis, plant workers were exposed to unhealthy levels of radiation, but no one outside Three Mile Island had their health adversely affected by the accident. Nonetheless, the incident greatly eroded the public’s faith in nuclear power. The unharmed Unit-1 reactor at Three Mile Island, which was shut down during the crisis, did not resume operation until 1985. Cleanup continued on Unit-2 until 1990, but it was too damaged to be rendered usable again. In the more than two decades since the accident at Three Mile Island, not a single new nuclear power plant has been ordered in the United States.
    [​IMG]

    On this day in 1814, the funeral of Dr. Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, the inventor and namesake of the infamous execution device, takes place outside of Paris, France. Guillotin had what he felt were the purest motives for inventing the guillotine and was deeply distressed at how his reputation had become besmirched in the aftermath. Guillotin had bestowed the deadly contraption on the French as a “philanthropic gesture” for the systematic criminal justice reform that was taking place in 1789. The machine was intended to show the intellectual and social progress of the Revolution; by killing aristocrats and journeymen the same way, equality in death was ensured.
    [​IMG]

    On this day in 2006, Duke University officials suspend the men’s lacrosse team for two games following allegations that team members sexually assaulted a stripper hired to perform at a party. Three players were later charged with rape. The case became a national scandal, impacted by issues of race, politics and class.
    In April 2007, all charges against the young men were dropped due to lack of credible evidence and the district attorney was eventually disbarred for his mishandling of the case.
    :boobies:

    On this day in 1984, Bob Irsay (1923-1997), owner of the once-mighty Baltimore Colts, moves the team to Indianapolis. Without any sort of public announcement, Irsay hired movers to pack up the team’s offices in Owings Mills, Maryland, in the middle of the night, while the city of Baltimore slept. :backstab: :sneakyninja: :backstabber:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 28, 2016
  3. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1774 - Britain passed the Coercive Act against Massachusetts.
    :idunno:

    1797 - Nathaniel Briggs patented a washing machine.
    :laundry2:

    1865 - Outdoor advertising legislation was enacted in New York. The law banned "painting on stones, rocks and trees."
    :dont:

    1910 - The first seaplane took off from water at Martinques, France. The pilot was Henri Fabre.
    :snoopy_flies:

    1911 - In New York, suffragists performed the political play "Pageant of Protest."
    :encore:

    1938 - In Italy, psychiatrists demonstrated the use of electric-shock therapy for treatment of certain mental illnesses
    :thechair:

    1974 - A streaker ran onto the set of "The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson."
    :flasher:

    1991 - The U.S. embassy in Moscow was severely damaged by fire.
    :panic:

    2002 - The exhibit "The Italians: Three Centuries of Italian Art" opened at the National Gallery of Australia.
    :artgallery:
     
  4. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    Two months after the signing of the Vietnam peace agreement, the last U.S. combat troops leave South Vietnam as Hanoi frees the remaining American prisoners of war held in North Vietnam, on this day in 1973. America’s direct eight-year intervention in the Vietnam War was at an end. In Saigon, some 7,000 U.S. Department of Defense civilian employees remained behind to aid South Vietnam in conducting what looked to be a fierce and ongoing war with communist North Vietnam.
    :peace:

    In 1951, in one of the most sensational trials in American history, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg are convicted of espionage for their role in passing atomic secrets to the Soviets during and after World War II. The husband and wife were later sentenced to death and were executed in 1953.
    :thechair:

    On this day in 1951, a homemade device explodes at Grand Central Station in New York City, startling commuters but injuring no one. In the next few months, five more bombs were found at landmark sites around New York, including the public library. Authorities realized that this new wave of terrorist acts was the work of the Mad Bomber.
    :blowup1:

    The combination of an earthquake and a volcanic eruption at El Chichon in southern Mexico converts a hill into a crater, kills thousands of people and destroys acres of farmland on this day in 1982. The eruptions, which continued for over a week, caught many of the area residents unaware and unprepared.
    :shakie: :panic:

    In 1974, the unmanned U.S. space probe Mariner 10, launched by NASA in November 1973, becomes the first spacecraft to visit the planet Mercury, sending back close-up images of a celestial body usually obscured because of its proximity to the sun.
    :weownthat:
     
  5. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1461 - Edward IV secured his claim to the English thrown by defeating Henry VI’s Lancastrians at the battle of Towdon.
    :thwack:

    1638 - First permanent European settlement in Delaware was established.
    :rednecktrailer:

    1867 - The British Parliament passed the North America Act to create the Dominion of Canada.
    :canada:

    1903 - A regular news service began between New York and London on Marconi's wireless.
    :help:
     
  6. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On March 30, 1981, President Ronald Reagan is shot in the chest outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by a deranged drifter named John Hinckley Jr.
    :pshoopshoo:

    A floating apartment for oil workers in the North Sea collapses, killing 123 people, on this day in 1980.
    :shipwrecked:

    In 1867, U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward signs a treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska for $7 million. Despite the bargain price of roughly two cents an acre, the Alaskan purchase was ridiculed in Congress and in the press as “Seward’s folly,” “Seward’s icebox,” and President Andrew Johnson’s “polar bear garden.”
    :snow:

    In 1814, European forces allied against Napoleonic France march triumphantly into Paris, formally ending a decade of French domination on the Continent.
    :rapier:

    In 1870, following its ratification by the requisite three-fourths of the states, the 15th Amendment, granting African-American men the right to vote, is formally adopted into the U.S. Constitution. Passed by Congress the year before, the amendment reads, “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”
    One day after it was adopted, Thomas Peterson-Mundy of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, became the first African American to vote under the authority of the 15th Amendment.
    :2_thumbs_up:
     
  7. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1533 - Henry VIII divorced his first wife, Catherine of Aragon.
    :gtfo3:

    1822 - Florida became a U.S. territory.
    :TOB:

    1842 - Dr. Crawford W. Long performed the first operation while his patient was anesthetized by ether.
    :dizzy:

    1858 - Hyman L. Lipman of Philadelphia patented the pencil.
    :takeabow:

    1870 - Texas was readmitted to the Union.
    :Bighug:

    1909 - The Queensboro bridge in New York opened linking Manhattan and Queens. It was the first double decker bridge.
    :declare:

    1970 - "Applause" opened on Broadway.
    :golfclap::golfclap::devilwag:

    1987 - Vincent Van Gogh's "Sunflowers" was bought for $39.85 million.
    :michelle::michelle:
     
  8. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On March 31, 1889, the Eiffel Tower is dedicated in Paris in a ceremony presided over by Gustave Eiffel, the tower’s designer, and attended by French Prime Minister Pierre Tirard, a handful of other dignitaries, and 200 construction workers.
    :wine:

    In 1999, Law enforcement officers in Elephant Butte, New Mexico, began digging for evidence near the mobile home of David Parker Ray and Cynthia Lea Hendy after more evidence came to light about the couple’s activities.
    On March 22nd, a twenty-two year old woman was found running naked, except for a padlocked metal collar around her neck, down an unpaved road near Elephant Butte State Park. She told police that Ray and Hendy had abducted her three days earlier in Albuquerque before bringing her to the mobile home where she was raped and tortured.
    Sounds like a typical Saturday night on the JerzeeDevil! :realfunny: :sex_porn:

    In 1973, the Mississippi River reaches its peak level in St. Louis during a record 77-day flood. During the extended flood, 33 people died and more than $1 billion in damages were incurred.
    The roots of the 1973 flood go back to October 1972, when above-average rain began falling in the river basins that feed the Mississippi River. With more precipitation than normal coming down through the winter, the stage was set for flooding when hard rain came down in March. With most of the Midwest already saturated, the Mississippi began rising slowly to flood levels.
    By the middle of March, flood waters began inundating some communities along the Mississippi. The worst of it came in early April when 6 million acres south of St. Louis, Missouri, were claimed by the river and many levees crumbled and failed.
    As they moved downstream, the rising waters threatened the city of New Orleans. Officials decided to divert some of the water to Lake Ponchartrain and the Gulf of Mexico. This ended the threat to New Orleans, but came at the expense of hundreds of farms in the area. In some areas, the floods continued until June.
    Floods of this type are not typically as deadly as flash floods because there is sufficient warning and time to evacuate flood regions. Those who died in this instance were largely residents who had resisted evacuation orders. Still, the flood devastated the economy of the region, as very few families had flood insurance and millions of acres of farm land were unusable for a full year following the flood.
    :drowning:

    In 1492, in Spain, a royal edict is issued by the nation’s Catholic rulers declaring that all Jews who refuse to convert to Christianity will be expelled from the country. Most Spanish Jews chose exile rather than the renunciation of their religion and culture, and the Spanish economy suffered with the loss of an important portion of its workforce. Many Spanish Jews went to North Africa, the Netherlands, and the Americas, where their skills, capital, and commercial connections were put to good use. Among those who chose conversion, some risked their lives by secretly practicing Judaism, while many sincere converts were nonetheless persecuted by the Spanish Inquisition. The Spanish Muslims, or Moors, were ordered to convert to Christianity in 1502.
    :priest:

    The Dalai Lama, fleeing the Chinese suppression of a national uprising in Tibet, crosses the border into India, where he is granted political asylum, on this day in 1959.
    :Praying:

    Major League Baseball players are sent back to work after the longest strike in baseball history ends on this day in 1995. Because of the strike, the 1994 World Series was cancelled; it was the first time baseball did not crown a champion in 89 years.
    :surrender:
     
  9. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1900 - The W.E. Roach Company was the first automobile company to put an advertisement in a national magazine. The magazine was the "Saturday Evening Post".
    :newspaper:

    1900 - In France, the National Assembly passed a law reducing the workday for women and children to 11 hours.
    :devilzeek

    1923 - In New York City, the first U.S. dance marathon was held. Alma Cummings set a new world record of 27 hours.
    :Celebration::dancingcool:

    1932 - The Ford Motor Co. debuted its V-8 engine.
    :drool:

    1994 - "Nature" magazine announced that a complete skull of Australopithecus afarensis had been found in Ethiopia. The finding is of humankind's earliest ancestor.
    :punisher:
     
  10. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1700, English pranksters begin popularizing the annual tradition of April Fools’ Day by playing practical jokes on each other.
    :fool:

    On this day in 1993, race car driver and owner Alan Kulwicki, who won the 1992 National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) Winston Cup championship by one of the tightest margins in series history, is killed in a plane crash near Bristol, Tennessee, where he was scheduled to compete in a race the following day.
    The 38-year-old Kulwicki, known as the "Polish Prince", had been the first owner-driver to collect the championship since Richard Petty did so in 1979, as well as the first NASCAR champ to hold a college degree.
    :irsmart: :shift:

    On this day in 1946, an undersea earthquake off the Alaskan coast triggers a massive tsunami that kills 159 people in Hawaii.
    :drowning:

    At the peak of his career, Marvin Gaye was the Prince of Motown—the soulful voice behind hits as wide-ranging as How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You) and Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology).
    Like his label-mate Stevie Wonder, Gaye both epitomized and outgrew the crowd-pleasing sound that made Motown famous. Over the course of his roughly 25-year recording career, he moved successfully from upbeat pop to “message” music to satin-sheet soul, combining elements of Smokey Robinson, Bob Dylan and Barry White into one complicated and sometimes contradictory package. But as the critic Michael Eric Dyson put it, the man who “chased away the demons of millions… with his heavenly sound and divine art” was chased by demons of his own throughout his life.
    That life came to a tragic end on this day 1984, when Marvin Gaye was shot and killed by his own father one day short of his 45th birthday.
    :slingshot:

    On this day in 1970, President Richard Nixon signs legislation officially banning cigarette ads on television and radio. Nixon, who was an avid pipe smoker, indulging in as many as eight bowls a day, supported the legislation at the increasing insistence of public health advocates.
    :smokin:

    On April 1, 1918, the British Royal Air Force (RAF) is formed as an amalgamation of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). The RAF took its place beside the British navy and army as a separate military service with its own ministry.
    :snoopy_flies:
     
  11. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 527 - Justinianus became the emperor of Byzantium.
    :pullo:

    1572 - The Sea Beggars under Guillaume de la Marck landed in Holland and captured the small town of Briel.
    :pirateship:

    1578 - William Harvey of England discovered blood circulation.
    :slice:

    1621 - The Plymouth, MA, colonists created the first treaty with Native Americans.
    :signhere:

    1724 - Jonathan Swift published Drapier's letters.
    :snoopy_type:

    1748 - The ruins of Pompeii were found.
    :jackhammer:

    1778 - Oliver Pollock, a New Orleans businessman, created the "$" symbol.
    :$:

    1853 - Cincinnati became the first U.S. city to pay fire fighters a regular salary.
    :fireman2::fireman2:

    1863 - The first wartime conscription law went into effect in the U.S.
    :obey:

    1891 - The London-Paris telephone connection opened.
    :telephone::telephone:

    1916 - The first U.S. national women's swimming championships were held.
    :drowning::drowning::drowning::drowning:

    :encore:

    1929 - Louie Marx introduced the Yo-Yo.
    :takeabow:

    1948 - The Berlin Airlift began.
    :snoopy_flies:

    1952 - The Big Bang theory was proposed in "Physical Review" by Alpher, Bethe & Gamow.
    :hump:

    1960 - The U.S. launched TIROS-1. It was the first weather satellite.
    :UFO:

    1987 - Steve Newman became the first man to walk around the world. The walk was 22,000 miles and took 4 years.
    :worldwide:
     
  12. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 2005, John Paul II, history’s most well-traveled pope and the first non-Italian to hold the position since the 16th century, dies at his home in the Vatican. Six days later, two million people packed Vatican City for his funeral, said to be the biggest funeral in history.
    :priest: :pope: :priest:

    In 1902, Esther Morris, the first woman judge in American history, dies in Cheyenne, Wyoming.
    :magestrate:

    In 1992 a jury in New York finds mobster John Gotti, nicknamed the Teflon Don for his ability to elude conviction, guilty on 13 counts, including murder and racketeering. In the wake of the conviction, the assistant director of the FBI’s New York office, James Fox, was quoted as saying, “The don is covered in Velcro, and every charge stuck.”
    On June 23 of that year, Gotti was sentenced to life in prison, dealing a significant blow to organized crime.
    :mugshot:

    The world’s first anthrax epidemic begins in Ekaterinburg, Russia (now Sverdlosk), on this day in 1979. By the time it ended six weeks later, 62 people were dead. Another 32 survived serious illness. Ekaterinburg, as the town was known in Soviet times, also suffered livestock losses from the epidemic.
    As people in Ekaterinburg first began reporting their illnesses, the Soviet government announced that the cause was tainted meat that the victims had eaten. Since the town was known in intelligence circles for its biological-weapons plant, much of the rest of the world was immediately skeptical of the Soviet explanation.
    It was not until 13 years later, in 1992, that the epidemic was finally explained: workers at the Ekaterinburg weapons plant failed to replace a crucial filter, causing a release of anthrax spores into the outside air. The wind carried the spores to a farming area and infected people and livestock in the area. Had the town been downwind from the plant at the time of the release, the death toll might have been considerably higher.
    :bullshit:

    Near present-day St. Augustine, Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon comes ashore on the Florida coast, and claims the territory for the Spanish crown on this day in 1513.
    :2handed: :thrust:

    On April 2, 1982, Argentina invades the Falklands Islands, a British colony since 1892 and British possession since 1833. Argentine amphibious forces rapidly overcame the small garrison of British marines at the town of Stanley on East Falkland and the next day seized the dependent territories of South Georgia and the South Sandwich group. The 1,800 Falkland Islanders, mostly English-speaking sheep farmers (and penguin egg eaters! :bobert:), awaited a British response.
    :brit: [​IMG]

    On this day in 1977, racehorse Red Rum wins a historic third Grand National championship at Aintree Racecourse in Liverpool, England, after taking home victory in 1973 and 1974 and finishing second in 1975 and 1976. Red Rum remains the most successful horse in the history of the Grand National, which is considered by many to be the world’s toughest steeplechase race.
    :dedhorse:
     
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  13. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    In 1792 - The U.S. Congress passed the Coinage Act to regulate the coins of the United States. The act authorized $10 Eagles, $5 Half Eagles, $2.50 Quarter Eagle gold coins, silver dollars, dollars, quarters, dimes and half-dimes to be minted.
    :twocents:

    1860 - The first Italian Parliament met in Turin.
    :discussion:

    1889 - Charles Hall patented aluminium.
    :fergus:

    1935 - Sir Watson-Watt was granted a patent for RADAR.
    :takeabow:

    1972 - Burt Reynolds appeared nude in "Cosmopolitan" magazine.
    :shakeit:
     
  14. Kelper

    Kelper Penguin Egg Eater Lady Devil

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    April 2nd 1982, Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands. We remember the tragic loss of life of the ones who never made it home. Freedom is never free.

    The Islander's will never forget the sacrifices given eternally grateful we are.

    It's also nice to read how some of the service personnel are often travelling as tourists to see the life the people who were liberated.
     
    begreen61 likes this.
  15. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1860, the first Pony Express mail, traveling by horse and rider relay teams, simultaneously leaves St. Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California. Ten days later, on April 13, the westbound rider and mail packet completed the approximately 1,800-mile journey and arrived in Sacramento, beating the eastbound packet’s arrival in St. Joseph by two days and setting a new standard for speedy mail delivery.
    Although ultimately short-lived and unprofitable, the Pony Express captivated America’s imagination and helped win federal aid for a more economical overland postal system. It also contributed to the economy of the towns on its route and served the mail-service needs of the American West in the days before the telegraph or an efficient transcontinental railroad.
    :Cowboy:

    One of America’s most famous criminals, Jesse James, is shot to death by fellow gang member Bob Ford, who betrayed James for reward money on this day in 1882.
    :backstab:

    On this day in 1974, 148 tornadoes hit the United States heartland within 16 hours. By the time the deadly storm ended, 330 people had died. This was the largest grouping of tornadoes recorded in its time, affecting 11 states and Ontario, Canada. At any one moment during the storm, there were as many as 15 separate tornadoes touching the ground.
    :twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister::twister:

    In 1936, Richard Bruno Hauptmann, convicted in the 1932 kidnapping and murder of the 20-month-old son of Charles A. Lindbergh, is executed by electrocution.
    :thechair:

    In 1996, at his small wilderness cabin near Lincoln, Montana, Theodore John Kaczynski is arrested by FBI agents and accused of being the Unabomber, the elusive terrorist blamed for 16 mail bombs that killed three people and injured 23 during an 18-year period.
    :blowup1:

    Mario Lemieux wins the Art Ross Trophy as the National Hockey League’s top scorer on this day in 1988. Lemieux’s 168 points bested Wayne Gretzky, who had dominated the league as the top scorer for an amazing seven seasons.
    :nhl_fight:
     
  16. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1829 - James Carrington patented the coffee mill.
    :coffeepot:

    1866 - Rudolph Eickemeyer and G. Osterheld patented a blocking and shaping machine for hats.
    :heythere:

    1948 - U.S. President Harry Truman signed the Marshall Plan to revive war-torn Europe. It was $5 billion in aid for 16 countries.
    :clap:

    1972 - Charlie Chaplin returned to the U.S. after a twenty-year absence.
    :chaplin:

    1986 - The U.S. national debt hit $2 trillion.
    :devilzeek
     
  17. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    Just after 6 p.m. on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. is fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story room at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader was in Memphis to support a sanitation workers’ strike and was on his way to dinner when a bullet struck him in the jaw and severed his spinal cord. King was pronounced dead after his arrival at a Memphis hospital. He was 39 years old.
    :rip:

    On this day in 1933, a dirigible crashes in New Jersey, killing 73 people in one of the first air disasters in history. The Akron was the largest airship built in the United States when it took its first flight in August 1931. In its short life of less than two years, it was involved in two fatal accidents.
    :panic1:

    In 1949, The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is established by 12 Western nations: the United States, Great Britain, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Iceland, Canada, and Portugal. The military alliance, which provided for a collective self-defense against Soviet aggression, greatly increased American influence in Europe.
    :handshake:

    According to the recollection of one of his friends, Ward Hill Lamon, President Abraham Lincoln dreams on this night in 1865 of “the subdued sobs of mourners” and a corpse lying on a catafalque in the White House East Room. In the dream, Lincoln asked a soldier standing guard “Who is dead in the White House?” to which the soldier replied, “the President. He was killed by an assassin.” Lincoln woke up at that point. On April 11, he told Lamon that the dream had “strangely annoyed” him ever since. Ten days after having the dream, Lincoln was shot dead by an assassin while attending the theater.
    :ssad:

    Bill France Jr., the leading force behind the transformation of the National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) from a regional sport into a multibillion-dollar industry with fans worldwide, is born on this day in 1933 in Washington, D.C. France’s father, William France Sr. (1909-92), founded NASCAR in 1948.
    :shift:

    On this day in 1982, hockey sensation Wayne Gretzky of the Edmonton Oilers finishes the NHL season with 212 points, the first and only player in NHL history to break the 200-point barrier.
    :penaltybox:
     
  18. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 896 - Formosus ended his reign as pope.
    :pope:

    1541 - Ignatius of Loyola became the first superior-general of the Jesuits.
    :kneel:

    1581 - Francis Drake completed the circumnavigation of the world.
    :worldwide:

    1687 - King James II ordered that his declaration of indulgence be read in church.
    :priest:

    1902 - British Financier Cecil Rhodes left $10 million in his will that would provide scholarships for Americans to Oxford University in England.
    :takeabow:

    1914 - The first known serialized moving picture opened in New York City, NY. It was "The Perils of Pauline".
    :panic:

    1932 - After five years of research, professor C.G. King, of the University of Pittsburgh, isolated vitamin C.
    :soupy:

    1969 - Dr. Denton Cooley implanted the first temporary artificial heart.
    :heart:
     
  19. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1614, Pocahontas, daughter of the chief of the Powhatan Indian confederacy, marries English tobacco planter John Rolfe in Jamestown, Virginia. The marriage ensured peace between the Jamestown settlers and the Powhatan Indians for several years.
    :love4ever:

    In 1951, the climax of the most sensational spy trial in American history is reached when a federal judge sentences Julius and Ethel Rosenberg to death for their roles in passing atomic secrets to the Soviets. Although the couple proclaimed their innocence, they died in the electric chair in June 1953.
    :thechair:

    On this day in 1859, naturalist Charles Darwin sends his publishers the first three chapters of Origin of Species, which will become one of the most influential books ever published.
    :monkeysflyout:

    George Washington exercises the first presidential veto of a Congressional bill on this day in 1792. The bill introduced a new plan for dividing seats in the House of Representatives that would have increased the amount of seats for northern states.
    After consulting with his politically divided and contentious cabinet, Washington, who came from the southern state of Virginia, ultimately decided that the plan was unconstitutional because, in providing for additional representatives for some states, it would have introduced a number of representatives higher than that proscribed by the Constitution.
    :nono:

    On the morning after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., city officials in Boston, Massachusetts, were scrambling to prepare for an expected second straight night of violent unrest. Similar preparations were being made in cities across America, including in the nation’s capital, where armed units of the regular Army patrolled outside the White House and U.S. Capitol following President Johnson’s state-of-emergency declaration. But Boston would be nearly alone among America’s major cities in remaining quiet and calm that turbulent Friday night, thanks in large part to one of the least quiet and calm musical performers of all time. On the night of April 5, 1968, James Brown kept the peace in Boston by the sheer force of his music and his personal charisma.
    :hammertime:

    Best known in his later years as the outspoken president of the National Rifle Association (NRA), the actor Charlton Heston first earned a reputation in Hollywood for playing larger-than-life figures in epic movies such as The Ten Commandments and Ben-Hur. He died on this day in 2008, at the age of 84.
    :undead:

    Also in death on this date...

    In 1976, Howard Robard Hughes, one of the richest men to emerge from the American West during the 20th century, dies while flying from Acapulco to Houston.
    :theundead:

    In 1994, modern rock icon Kurt Cobain commits suicide. His body was discovered inside his home in Seattle, Washington, three days later by Gary Smith, an electrician, who was installing a security system in the suburban house. Despite indications that Cobain, the lead singer of Nirvana, killed himself, several skeptics questioned the circumstances of his death and pinned responsibility on his wife, Courtney Love.
    :dead:

    In 2000, Lee Petty, an early star of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) and the patriarch of a racing dynasty that includes his son, NASCAR legend Richard Petty, dies at the age 86 in Greensboro, North Carolina. Lee Petty won more than 50 races during his career, including three NASCAR championships, the first driver to rack up that many championship titles. He also won the first-ever Daytona 500, held in 1959.
    :yakk:
     
  20. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1242 - Russian troops repelled an invasion attempt by the Teutonic Knights.
    :thwack:

    1621 - The Mayflower sailed from Plymouth, MA, on a return trip to England.
    :pirateship:

    1806 - Isaac Quintard patented the cider mill.
    :cheers:

    1827 - James H. Hackett became the first American actor to appear abroad as he performed at Covent Garden in London, England.
    :takeabow:

    1843 - Queen Victoria proclaimed Hong Kong to be a British crown colony.
    :queen::brit:

    1892 - In New York, the Ithaca Daily Journal published an ad introducing a new 10 cent Ice Cream Specialty called a Cherry Sunday.
    :newspaper:

    1923 - Firestone Tire and Rubber Company began the first regular production of balloon tires.
    :shift:

    1930 - Mahatma Ghandi defied British law by making salt in India.
    :bobby:
     

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