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On this day, the daily facts thread

zorro Jul 15, 2014

  1. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1938 - Oil was discovered in Saudi Arabia.
    :gotfield:

    1951 - General de Lattre demanded that Paris send him more troops for the fight in Vietnam.
    :obey::obey::obey::obey::obey::obey:
     
  2. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    In 1802, The United States Military Academy–the first military school in the United States–is founded by Congress for the purpose of educating and training young men in the theory and practice of military science. Located at West Point, New York, the U.S. Military Academy is often simply known as West Point.
    [​IMG]

    One of the world’s worst supertanker disasters takes places when the Amoco Cadiz wrecks off the coast of Portsall, France, on this day in 1978. Although the 68 million gallons of oil that spilled from the Cadiz has since been exceeded by other spills, this remains the largest shipwreck in history.
    The Cadiz was 65 meters longer than the Titanic and capable of carrying more than 250,000 tons of crude oil. The huge supertanker was owned by Amoco, an American company, but was registered in Liberia and helmed by a mostly Italian crew.
    :shipwrecked:

    On this day in 1945, the west Pacific volcanic island of Iwo Jima is declared secured by the U.S. military after months of fiercely fighting its Japanese defenders.
    :Iwo_Jima:

    In 1903, Roy Bean, the self-proclaimed “law west of the Pecos,” dies in Langtry, Texas.
    :twinshots:

    On this day in 2003, race car driver Ricky Craven wins the Darlington 500, crossing the finish line .002 seconds ahead of Kurt Busch for the closest recorded finish in National Association for Stock Car Racing (NASCAR) history.
    :shift:
     
  3. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1190 - The Crusaders began the massacre of Jews in York, England.
    :cathar: :devilzeek

    1521 - Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan reached the Philippines. He was killed the next month by natives.
    :tikiman:

    1527 - The Emperor Babur defeated the Rajputs at the Battle of Kanvaha in India.
    :turban:

    1621 - Samoset walked into the settlement of Plymouth Colony, later Plymouth, MA. Samoset was a native from the Monhegan tribe in Maine who spoke English.
    :what_the:

    1871 - The State of Delaware enacted the first fertilizer law.
    :shitshovel:

    1917 - Russian Czar Nicholas II abdicated his throne.
    :king2:

    1926 - Physicist Robert H. Goddard launched the first liquid-fuel rocket.
    :takeabow:

    1993 - In France, ostrich meat was officially declared fit for human consumption.
    :eat:

    1995 - NASA astronaut Norman Thagard became the first American to visit the Russian space station Mir.
    :astronaut:
     
  4. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 461 A.D., Saint Patrick, Christian missionary, bishop and apostle of Ireland, dies at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland.
    :leprechaun:

    In 1762, in New York City, the first parade honoring the Catholic feast day of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is held by Irish soldiers serving in the British army.
    :pimptastic:

    A powerful earthquake and a full day of aftershocks rock Taiwan on this day in 1906, killing over 1,200 people. This terrifying day of tremors destroyed several towns and caused millions of dollars in damages.
    :shakie:

    Written on the spot and recorded as an afterthought near the end of a session at Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles, the song— "Tequila" —hit #1 on the Billboard pop chart on March 17, 1958. It was the Champs’ one, and only, pop hit. Half a century later, this accidental, one-word classic still sounds as fresh and irresistible as it did to the long-forgotten Cleveland disk jockey who rescued it from the cutout bin of history.
    [video=youtube_share;BodXwAYeTfM]https://youtu.be/BodXwAYeTfM[/video]

    Future president Franklin Delano Roosevelt weds his fifth cousin once removed, Eleanor Roosevelt, in New York on this day in 1905.
    :love4ever:
     
  5. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1766 - Britain repealed the Stamp Act that had caused resentment in the North American colonies.
    :magestrate:

    1901 - In Paris, Vincent Van Gogh's paintings were shown at the Bernheim Gallery.
    :artgallery:

    1930 - Al Capone was released from jail.
    :alcapone:

    1958 - The Vanguard 1 satellite was launched by the U.S.
    :UFO:

    1966 - A U.S. submarine found a missing H-bomb in the Mediterranean off of Spain.
    :whoa:

    1967 - Snoopy and Charlie Brown of "Peanuts" were on the cover of "LIFE" magazine.
    :snoopydance:

    1989 - A series of solar flares caused a violent magnetic storm that brought power outages over large regions of Canada.
    :sunshining:

    1992 - White South Africans approved constitutional reforms to give legal equality to blacks.
    :clap:
     
  6. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1852, in New York City, Henry Wells and William G. Fargo join with several other investors to launch their namesake business.
    :wallet:

    On this day in 1999, the bodies of Carole Sund and Silvina Pelosso are found in a charred rental car in a remote wooded area of Long Barn, California. The women, along with Sund’s daughter Juli, had been missing since February when they were last seen alive at the Cedar Lodge near Yosemite National Park. Juli Sund’s body was found thirty miles away a week after the car was found.
    :panic:

    Nearly 300 students in Texas are killed by an explosion of natural gas at their school on this day in 1937.
    :blowup1:

    On this day in 1937, the worst tornado in U.S. history passes through eastern Missouri, southern Illinois, and southern Indiana, killing 695 people, injuring some 13,000 people, and causing $17 million in property damage.
    Known as the “Tri-State Tornado,” the deadly twister began its northeast track in Ellington, Missouri, but southern Illinois was the hardest hit. More than 500 of the total 695 people who perished were killed in southern Illinois, including 234 in Murphrysboro and 127 in West Frankfort.
    :twister:

    On this day in 2002, 13-year-old Brittanie Cecil dies, two days after being struck in the head by a puck at a Columbus Blue Jackets ice hockey game. Cecil’s death forced the National Hockey League to take new precautions regarding fan safety.
    :penaltybox:
     
  7. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 2003, the United States, along with coalition forces primarily from the United Kingdom, initiates war on Iraq. Just after explosions began to rock Baghdad, Iraq’s capital, U.S. President George W. Bush announced in a televised address, “At this hour, American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger.”
    President Bush and his advisors built much of their case for war on the idea that Iraq, under dictator Saddam Hussein, possessed or was in the process of building weapons of mass destruction.
    :tinfoilviking:

    In 1916, eight Curtiss “Jenny” planes of the First Aero Squadron take off from Columbus, New Mexico, in the first combat air mission in U.S. history. The First Aero Squadron, organized in 1914 after the outbreak of World War I, was on a support mission for the 7,000 U.S. troops who invaded Mexico to capture Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa.
    :snoopy_flies:

    In 1931, in an attempt to lift the state out of the hard times of the Great Depression, the Nevada state legislature votes to legalize gambling.
    :gamer: :wallet:

    On this day in 1971, an earthquake sets off a series of calamities—a landslide, flood and avalanche–that results in the destruction of the town of Chungar, Peru, and the death of 600 of its inhabitants.
    :shakie: :dontpanic:

    In the spring of 1957, Elvis Presley was completing his second Hollywood movie, Loving You, and his first movie soundtrack album. He had two studio albums and 48 singles already under his belt and two years of nearly nonstop live appearances behind him. If his life had taken a different path, the spring of 1957 might have seen Elvis Presley filling out law school applications or interviewing for his first job as college graduation approached. But the hardworking son of Gladys and Vernon Presley was already his family’s primary breadwinner in the spring of 1957, and already looking, at the tender age of 22, to purchase them a new home for the second time. He found that home on the outskirts of Memphis—a southern Colonial mansion on a 13.8-acre wooded estate. With a $1,000 cash deposit against a sale price of $102,500, Elvis Presley agreed to purchase the home called Graceland on March 19, 1957.
    :$:
     
  8. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1628 - The Massachusetts colony was founded by Englishmen.
    :brit:

    1687 - French explorer La Salle was murdered by his own men while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River, in the Gulf of Mexico.
    :lynchmob: :strangle:

    1702 - Upon the death of William III of Orange, Anne Stuart, the sister of Mary, succeeds to the throne of England, Scotland and Ireland.
    :queen:

    1831 - The first bank robbery in America was reported. The City Bank of New York City lost $245,000 in the robbery.
    :badhombre:

    1895 - The Los Angeles Railway was established to provide streetcar service.
    :trainwreck:

    1900 - Archaeologist Arthur John Evans began the excavation of Knossos Palace in Greece.
    :jackhammer:

    1948 - Lee Savold knocked out Gino Buonvino in 54 seconds of the first round of their prize fight at Madison Square Gardens.
    :bigpunch:

    1964 - Sean Connery began shooting his role in "Goldfinger."
    :stu:

    1965 - Rembrandt's "Titus" sold for $7,770,000.
    :artist: :wallet:

    1990 - The first world ice hockey tournament for women was held in Ottawa.
    :nhl_fight:

    1994 - The largest omelet in history was made with 160,000 eggs in Yokohama, Japan.
    :chefcooking:
     
  9. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson notifies Alabama’s Governor George Wallace that he will use federal authority to call up the Alabama National Guard in order to supervise a planned civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery.
    :hugthumbs:

    According to scholars at the University of Paris, the Black Death is created on this day in 1345, from what they call “a triple conjunction of Saturn, Jupiter and Mars in the 40th degree of Aquarius, occurring on the 20th of March 1345". The Black Death, also known as the Plague, swept across Europe, the Middle East and Asia during the 14th century, leaving an estimated 25 million dead in its wake.
    :wtf: :reaper:

    In 1995, several packages of deadly sarin gas are set off in the Tokyo subway system killing twelve people and injuring over 5,000. Sarin gas was invented by the Nazis and is one of the most lethal nerve gases known to man. Tokyo police quickly learned who had planted the chemical weapons and began tracking the terrorists down. Thousands of checkpoints were set up across the nation in the massive dragnet.
    :fart: :death01:

    With her smoldering looks and guitar hooks, Joan Jett had rock-star charisma to rival any man's. Jett burst onto the scene as a solo artist with "I Love Rock 'n' Roll," the three-chord anthem that topped the Billboard pop chart on March 20, 1982.
    :rockwoot:
     
  10. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 141 - The 6th recorded perihelion passage of Halley's Comet took place.
    :flamer:

    1413 - Henry V took the throne of England upon the death of his father Henry IV.
    :king2:

    1616 - Walter Raleigh was released from Tower of London to seek gold in Guyana.
    :pirategrin:

    1760 - The great fire of Boston destroyed 349 buildings.
    :panic:

    1815 - Napoleon Bonaparte entered Paris after his escape from Elba and began his "Hundred Days" rule.
    :kneel:

    1852 - Harriet Beecher Stowe’s book "Uncle Tom’s Cabin," subtitled "Life Among the Lowly," was first published.
    :piglet:

    1868 - Jesse James Gang robbed a bank in Russelville, KY, of $14,000.
    :str8shooter::docholiday::badhombre:

    1886 - The first AC power plant in the U.S. began commercial operation.
    :porchlights::porchlights::porchlights:

    1899 - At Sing Sing prison, Martha M. Place became the first woman to be executed in the electric chair. She was put to death for the murder of her stepdaughter.
    :thechair:

    1903 - In Paris, paintings by Henri Matisse were shown at the "Salon des Independants".
    :artgallery:

    1915 - The French called off the Champagne offensive on the Western Front.
    :toast:

    1947 - A blue whale weighing 180-metric tons was caught in the South Atlantic.
    :fishing:

    1996 - The U.K. announced that humans could catch CJD (Mad Cow Disease).
    :bullshit:

    1999 - Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones became the first men to circumnavigate the Earth in a hot air balloon. The non-stop trip began on March 3 and covered 26,500 miles.
    :pooh::pooh:
     
  11. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1871, journalist Henry Morton Stanley begins his famous search through Africa for the missing British explorer Dr. David Livingstone.
    :searchfunction:

    In 1963, Alcatraz Prison in San Francisco Bay closes down and transfers its last prisoners. At it’s peak period of use in 1950s, "The Rock", or "America’s Devil Island" housed over 200 inmates at the maximum-security facility. Alcatraz remains an icon of American prisons for its harsh conditions and record for being inescapable.
    [​IMG]

    In 1932, a storm system arising in the Gulf of Mexico spawns a devastating series of tornadoes that kills more than 350 people across the Southeast over two days. Thousands were seriously injured and many were left homeless by this deadly rash of twisters.
    :twister: :twister: :twister: :twister: :twister: :twister:

    On this day in 1980, J.R. Ewing, the character millions love to hate on television’s popular prime-time drama Dallas, is shot by an unknown assailant. The shooting made the season-ending episode one of TV’s most famous cliffhangers, inspired widespread media coverage and left America wondering “Who shot J.R.?” for the next eight months.
    SPOILER ALERT!! :bobert: On November 21, 1980, the premiere episode of Dallas’s third season solved the mystery, identifying Kristin Shepard, J.R.’s mistress (and his wife’s sister), as the culprit.
    :TVsurf:

    On this day in 1980, President Jimmy Carter announces that the U.S. will boycott the Olympic Games scheduled to take place in Moscow that summer. The announcement came after the Soviet Union failed to comply with Carter’s February 20, 1980, deadline to withdraw its troops from Afghanistan.
    :perfect10:
     
  12. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1556 - Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, was burned at the stake at Oxford after retracting the last of seven recantations that same day.
    :Flamingeek:

    1788 - Almost the entire city of New Orleans, LA, was destroyed by fire. 856 buildings were destroyed.
    :panic:

    1804 - The French civil code, the Code Napoleon, was adopted.
    :signhere:

    1835 - Charles Darwin & Mariano Gonzales met at Portillo Pass.
    :handshake:

    1908 - A passenger was carried in a bi-plane for the first time by Henri Farman of France.
    :snoopy_flies:

    1935 - Incubator ambulance service began in Chicago, IL.
    :wahmbulance:

    1965 - The U.S. launched Ranger 9. It was the last in a series of unmanned lunar explorations.
    :UFO:

    2001 - Nintendo released Game Boy Advance.
    :gamer:

    2002 - In Paris, an 1825 print by French inventor Joseph Nicephore Niepce was sold for $443,220. The print, of a man leading a horse, was the earliest recorded image taken by photographic means.
    :camera:
     
  13. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    In an effort to raise funds to pay off debts and defend the vast new American territories won from the French in the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763), the British government passes the Stamp Act on this day in 1765. The legislation levied a direct tax on all materials printed for commercial and legal use in the colonies, from newspapers and pamphlets to playing cards and dice.
    :wallet:

    On this day in 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Beer and Wine Revenue Act. This law levies a federal tax on all alcoholic beverages to raise revenue for the federal government and gives individual states the option to further regulate the sale and distribution of beer and wine.
    :vino: :andy: :$:

    On this day in 1983, the Pentagon awards a production contract worth more than $1 billion to AM General Corporation to develop 55,000 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV). Nicknamed the Humvee and designed to transport troops and cargo, the wide, rugged vehicles entered the spotlight when they were used by the American military during the 1989 invasion of Panama and the Persian Gulf War in the early 1990s.
    :shift:

    Quito, Ecuador, the site of many powerful earthquakes through the years, suffers one of its worst when a tremor kills 5,000 people and destroys some of the most famous buildings in South America, on this day in 1859.
    :shakie:

    On this day in 2014, 43 people die when a portion of a hill suddenly collapses and buries a neighborhood in the small community of Oso, Washington, some 55 miles northeast of Seattle. It was one of the deadliest mudslides in U.S. history.
    :forecastrain:

    On this day in 1894, the first championship series for Lord Stanley’s Cup is played in Montreal, Canada. The Stanley Cup has since become one of the most cherished and recognized trophies in sport.
    :penaltybox: :cup:
     
  14. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    I must apologise for posting events from the 23rd of March in error.

    I have flagellated myself and am wearing a hair shirt as I type this.

    I believe the correct term is dufus......................:facepalm:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 23, 2016
  15. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1839, the initials “O.K.” are first published in The Boston Morning Post. Meant as an abbreviation for “oll correct,” a popular slang misspelling of “all correct” at the time, OK steadily made its way into the everyday speech of Americans.
    :doh:

    In 1983, in an address to the nation, President Ronald Reagan proposes that the United States embark on a program to develop antimissile technology that would make the country nearly impervious to attack by nuclear missiles. Reagan’s speech marked the beginning of what came to be known as the controversial Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), also known as "Star Wars".
    :spacedevil:

    A horrible month for weather-related disasters in the United States culminates with a devastating tornado ripping through Nebraska, near Omaha, on this day in 1913. It was the worst of five twisters that struck that day in Nebraska and Iowa, killing 115 people in total.
    :twister: :twister: :twister: :twister: :twister:

    On March 23, 1983, Barney Clark dies 112 days after becoming the world’s first recipient of a permanent artificial heart. The 61-year-old dentist spent the last four months of his life in a hospital bed at the University of Utah Medical Center in Salt Lake City, attached to a 350-pound console that pumped air in and out of the aluminum-and-plastic implant through a system of hoses.
    :heartbreaker:

    On March 23, 1994, Wayne Gretzky scores his 802nd goal, breaking his childhood idol Gordie Howe’s National Hockey League record for most goals scored in a career. Gretzky, known to hockey fans as “The Great One,” broke a total of 61 offensive records in his NHL career, including many previously held by “Mr. Hockey” Gordie Howe.
    :nhl_fight:
     
  16. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    In 1490 - The first dated edition of Maimonides "Mishna Torah" was published.
    :piglet:

    1794 - Josiah G. Pierson patented a rivet machine.
    :neilson:

    1806 - Explorers Lewis and Clark, reached the Pacific coast, and began their return journey to the east.
    :highfive:

    1836 - The coin press was invented by Franklin Beale.
    :katbonk:

    1839 - The first recorded printed use of "OK" [oll korrect] occurred in Boston's Morning Post.
    :newspaper:

    1840 - The first successful photo of the Moon was taken.
    :camera:

    1880 - John Stevens patented the grain crushing mill. The mill increased flour production by 70 percent.
    :gears:

    1901 - Dame Nellie Melba, revealed the secret of her now famous toast.
    :encore:

    1903 - The Wright brothers obtained an airplane patent.
    :snoopy_pilot: :snoopy_pilot:

    1909 - British Lt. Shackleton found the magnetic South Pole.
    :brit:

    1957 - The U.S. Army sold the last of its homing pigeons.
    :turkey:

    1965 - America's first two-person space flight took off from Cape Kennedy with astronauts Virgil I. Grissom and John W. Young aboard. The craft was the Gemini 3.
    :UFO:

    1972 - Evel Knievel broke 93 bones after successfully jumping 35 cars.
    :moped:

    1989 - A 1,000-foot diameter asteroid missed Earth by 500,000 miles.
    :hide:

    2001 - Russia's orbiting Mir space station plunged into the South Pacific after its 15-years of use.
    :drowning:
     
  17. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    Yes, dufus is the correct term... :lulz: Of course, in the USA we spell it "Doofus" :winer: No wonder I was confused... :unintroduced: especially this morning when I saw what I thought was a duplicate post! :Confused2:

    Butt*, all is forgiven! [​IMG]

    On this day in 1989. one of the worst oil spills in U.S. territory begins when the supertanker Exxon Valdez, owned and operated by the Exxon Corporation, runs aground on a reef in Prince William Sound in southern Alaska. An estimated 11 million gallons of oil eventually spilled into the water.
    Attempts to contain the massive spill were unsuccessful, and wind and currents spread the oil more than 100 miles from its source, eventually polluting more than 700 miles of coastline. Hundreds of thousands of birds and animals were adversely affected by the environmental disaster.
    :sailor: :medicine:

    On this day in 2015, the co-pilot of a German airliner deliberately flies the plane into the French Alps, killing himself and the other 149 people onboard. When it crashed, Germanwings flight 9525 had been traveling from Barcelona, Spain, to Dusseldorf, Germany.
    :aviator:

    In 1998, Mitchell Johnson, 13,and Andrew Golden, 11,shoot their classmates and teachers in Jonesboro, Arkansas. Golden, the younger of the two boys, asked to be excused from his class, pulled a fire alarm and then ran to join Johnson in a wooded area 100 yards away from the school’s gym. As the students streamed out of the building, Johnson and Golden opened fire and killed four students and a teacher. Ten other children were wounded.
    [​IMG]

    On March 24, 1999, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) commences air strikes against Yugoslavia with the bombing of Serbian military positions in the Yugoslav province of Kosovo. The NATO offensive came in response to a new wave of ethnic cleansing launched by Serbian forces against the Kosovar Albanians on March 20.
    :blowup1:

    When Elvis Presley turned 18 on January 8, 1953, he fulfilled his patriotic duty and legal obligation to register his name with the Selective Service System, thereby making himself eligible for the draft. The Korean War was still underway at the time, but as a student in good standing at L.C. Humes High School in Memphis, Elvis received a student deferment that kept him from facing conscription during that conflict’s final months.
    Elvis would receive another deferment four years later when his draft number finally came up, but this time for a very different reason: to complete the filming of his third Hollywood movie, King Creole. With that obligation fulfilled, Uncle Sam would wait no longer.
    On March 24, 1958, Elvis Presley was finally inducted, starting his day as the King of Rock and Roll, but ending it as a lowly buck private in the United States Army.
    [​IMG]

    In 1603, after 44 years of rule, Queen Elizabeth I of England dies, and King James VI of Scotland ascends to the throne, uniting England and Scotland under a single British monarch.
    :queen: :king2:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 24, 2016
  18. zorro

    zorro The pointy end goes into the other man Brigade Member

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    On this day..............

    I suppose that makes me a double doofus then. :manganr:

    In 1883 - The first telephone call between New York and Chicago took place.
    :telephone: :telephone:

    1920 - The first U.S. coast guard air station was established at Morehead City, NC.
    :snoopy_flies:

    1955 - Tennessee Williams' play "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" debuted on Broadway.
    :ceilingcat:

    1960 - A U.S. appeals court ruled that the novel, "Lady Chatterly’s Lover", was not obscene and could be sent through the mail.
    :ups:

    I'm going off grid tomorrow for a few days, it's the first camp meet of the year.
    :campfire:

    Catch you later.
    :woody:
     
  19. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    In one of the darkest moments of America’s industrial history, the Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory in New York City burns down, killing 145 workers, on this day in 1911. The tragedy led to the development of a series of laws and regulations that better protected the safety of factory workers.
    :panic:

    On this day in 1982, Danica Patrick, the first woman to win an IndyCar Series race, America’s top level of open-wheel racing, is born in Beloit, Wisconsin.
    :formulaone:

    In 1975, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, King Faisal is shot to death by his nephew, Prince Faisal.
    :slingshot:

    In 1994, at the end of a largely unsuccessful 15-month mission, the last U.S. troops depart Somalia, leaving 20,000 U.N. troops behind to keep the peace and facilitate “nation building” in the divided country.
    :sosad:

    The U.S. Customs Department confiscates 520 copies of Allen Ginsberg’s book Howl, which had been printed in England. Officials alleged that the book was obscene.
    City Lights, a publishing company and bookstore in San Francisco owned by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, proceeded to publish the book in the fall of 1956. The publication led to Ferlinghetti’s arrest on obscenity charges. Ferlinghetti was bailed out by the American Civil Liberties Union, which led the legal defense. Nine literary experts testified at the trial that the poem was not obscene, and Ferlinghetti was found not guilty.
    Howl, which created a literary earthquake among the literary community when Ginsberg first read the poem in 1955, still stands as an important monument to the countercultural fervor of the late 1950s and ’60s. Ginsberg stayed at the forefront of numerous liberal movements throughout his life and became a well-loved lecturer at universities around the country. He continued to write and read poetry until his death from liver cancer in 1997.
    :Writing:

    Technically, the 25th anniversary of Motown Records should have been celebrated nine months later, in January 1984, but that was only one of several details glossed over in staging the landmark television special Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever.
    Filmed before a rapturous live audience on March 25, 1983, the Motown 25 special is perhaps best remembered for Michael Jackson’s performance of “Billie Jean,” which brought the house down and introduced much of the world to the “moonwalk.” There were other great performances that night, too, but there were also moments that revealed cracks in the joyous-reunion image that Motown chief Berry Gordy sought to portray.
    The most glaring breakdown in decorum came during what could have been the evening’s greatest triumph: the reunion of Diana Ross and the Supremes. When Ross, Mary Wilson and Cindy Birdsong performed together that night for the first time in 13 years, they took to the stage with something closer to 20 years’ worth of unresolved resentment among them. Early in their performance of “Someday We’ll Be Together,” as Diana slowly moved upstage, Mary and Cindy had the audacity to keep stride alongside her. Diana turned around and angrily pushed Mary back—a move that was carefully edited out of the later broadcast but which prompted Smokey Robinson and others to take the stage and form an impromptu chorus/demilitarized zone between the warring Supremes.
    The “Battle of the Bands” medley between the Temptations and the Four Tops was a much bigger creative success, though the biggest individual names in the Temptations—Eddie Kendricks and David Ruffin—were absent due to squabbling within the group, leaving Melvin Franklin and Otis Williams as the only original Temptations on stage that night.
    Also missing from the stage that night was a man whose name was then unfamiliar to all but the most obsessive Motown fans, but whose contribution to the label’s success was monumental. The late James Jamerson, whose bass guitar formed the foundation of almost every great Motown record of the 1960s, was in the building that night, but as a paying member of the audience seated in the back rows. His own troubles with alcohol abuse played a part in his estrangement from the Motown “family,” but so did a decades-long history of what he and fellow members of the Funk Brothers—the Motown backing band—felt was a lack of appreciation and respect for their role in creating the famous Motown sound.
    [​IMG]

    On this day in 1933, President Herbert Hoover accepts the newly commissioned USS Sequoia as the official presidential yacht. For 44 years, the Sequoia served as an occasional venue for recreation and official gatherings for eight U.S. presidents.
    :pirateship:
     
  20. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    In 1979, in a ceremony at the White House, Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin sign a historic peace agreement, ending three decades of hostilities between Egypt and Israel and establishing diplomatic and commercial ties.
    This historic peace lasted all of, oh, 'bout 3 minutes! :grouphug:

    In 1987, responding to a 911 call, police raid the Philadelphia home of Gary Heidnik and find an appalling crime scene. In the basement of Heidnik’s dilapidated house is a veritable torture chamber wherethree naked women were found chained toa sewer pipe. A fourth woman, Josefina Rivera, had escaped and called police.
    Although Heidnik was clearly mentally disturbed, he was found guilty and convicted of murder on July 1, 1988. He received a death sentence, and was executed on July 6, 1999.
    Heidnik was one the inspirations for the Buffalo Bill character in Thomas Harris’ Silence of the Lambs.
    It puts the lotion on its skin... :weirdo:

    An earthquake felt from Mexico to Oregon rocks the Owens Valley in California on this day in 1872, killing 30 people.
    :shakie:

    On March 26, 1953, American medical researcher Dr. Jonas Salk announces on a national radio show that he has successfully tested a vaccine against poliomyelitis, the virus that causes the crippling disease of polio. In 1952–an epidemic year for polio–there were 58,000 new cases reported in the United States, and more than 3,000 died from the disease. For promising eventually to eradicate the disease, which is known as “infant paralysis” because it mainly affects children, Dr. Salk was celebrated as the great doctor-benefactor of his time.
    :medicine:

    On this day in 1997, following an anonymous tip, police enter a mansion in Rancho Santa Fe, an exclusive suburb of San Diego, California, and discover 39 victims of a mass suicide. The deceased–21 women and 18 men of varying ages–were all found lying peaceably in matching dark clothes and Nike sneakers and had no noticeable signs of blood or trauma. It was later revealed that the men and women were members of the “Heaven’s Gate” religious cult, whose leaders preached that suicide would allow them to leave their bodily “containers” and enter an alien spacecraft hidden behind the Hale-Bopp comet.
    :UFO: :smileyring:

    On this day in 1804, President Thomas Jefferson attends a public party at the Senate and leads a diverse crowd in consuming an enormous loaf of bread dubbed the mammoth loaf. The giant bread was baked to go with the remnants of an enormous block of cheese.
    Two years earlier, a group of Baptist women from Massachusetts had sent Jefferson a 1,200- pound hunk of cheese in gratitude for his support of religious tolerance. The cheese, they said, illustrated Jefferson’s claim that North America’s superior natural resources would one day enable the U.S. to outstrip all of Europe in agricultural production.
    Early Americans’ use of the descriptive term mammoth arose from the discovery of a giant woolly mammoth skeleton in New York in 1801. Jefferson, fascinated with the natural sciences, was a member of the American Philosophical Society and helped the organization raise funds to complete the archaeological project. Jefferson’s Federalist opponents ridiculed the president’s scientific side projects as frivolous. In an attempt to embarrass the president, they dubbed the giant dairy product the mammoth cheese. To the Federalists’ surprise and disappointment, the general populace embraced the term with nationalistic zeal. Almost immediately, butcher shops and markets advertised mammoth-size products from sides of veal to pumpkins and loaves of bread.
    The unveiling of the mammoth loaf occurred at a Senate-sponsored March 26 party to rally support for a naval war against the Barbary States. At noon, a Navy baker wheeled in the mammoth loaf along with the remnants of the Baptist women’s mammoth cheese, an equally enormous side of roast beef and copious amounts of alcohol. President Jefferson stepped up, pulled out his pocketknife and cut the first slice of bread. According to written observations, the party quickly degenerated into a noisy, drunken affair.
    And, it's politics as usual! :bobert:

    On this day, Italy attacks the British fleet at Suda Bay, Crete, using detachable warheads to sink a British cruiser. This was the first time manned torpedoes had been employed in naval warfare, adding a new weapon to the world’s navies’ arsenals. :wtf:
    The manned torpedo, also known as the “Chariot,” was unique. Primarily used to attack enemy ships still in harbor, the Chariots needed “pilots” to “drive” them to their targets. Sitting astride the torpedo on a vehicle that would transport them both, the pilot would guide the missile as close to the target as possible, then ride the vehicle back, usually to a submarine. The Chariot was an enormous advantage; before its development, the closest weapon to the Chariot was the Japanese Kaitena human torpedo, or suicide bomb, which had obvious drawbacks. Well, duh!!:uhmno:
    The first successful use of the Chariot was by the Italian navy, although they referred to their version as Maiali, or “Pigs.” On March 26, six Italian motorboats, commanded by Italian naval commander Lt. Luigi Faggioni, entered Suda Bay in Crete and planted their Maiali along a British convoy in harbor there. The cruiser York was so severely damaged by the blast that it had to be beached.
    The manned torpedo proved to be the most effective weapon in the Italian naval arsenal, used successfully against the British again in December 1941 at Alexandria, Egypt. Italian torpedoes sank the British battleships Queen Elizabeth and Valiant, as well as one tanker. They were also used against merchant ships at Gibraltar and elsewhere.
    The British avenged themselves against the Italians, though, by sinking the new Italian cruiser Ulpio Traiano in the port of Palermo, Sicily, in early January 1943. An 8,500-ton ocean liner was also damaged in the same attack.
    After the Italian surrender, Britain, and later Germany, continued to use the manned torpedo. In fact, Germany succeeded in sinking two British minesweepers off Normandy Beach in July 1944, using their Neger torpedoes.
    :blowup1:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 26, 2016

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