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On this day, the daily facts thread

zorro Jul 15, 2014

  1. snache

    snache Should be a custom title here

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    Interesting about the Byrds.
     
  2. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    Maybe you deserve this...

    The Byrds...


    From the YouBoob notes...
    1965... #1 Ireland #1 UK Singles Chart #1 US Cash Box Top 100 #1 US Billboard Hot 100..

    Dylan wrote this on a road trip he took with some friends from New York to San Francisco. They smoked lots of marijuana along the way, replenishing their stash at post offices where they had mailed pot along the way. He started writing it after they got to Mardi Gras in New Orleans and partied there the night of February 11, 1964. Dylan claims that despite popular belief, this song is not about drugs. In the liner notes to his 1985 compilation Biograph, he wrote: "Drugs never played a part in that song... 'disappearing through the smoke rings in my mind,' that's not drugs; drugs were never that big a thing with me. I could take 'em or leave 'em, never hung me up."

    "Mr. Tambourine Man" changed the face of rock music. It launched The Byrds, convinced Dylan to "go electric," and started the folk-rock movement. David Crosby of The Byrds recalled the day Dylan heard them working on the song: "He came to hear us in the studio when we were building The Byrds. After the word got out that we gonna do 'Mr. Tambourine Man' and we were probably gonna be good, he came there and he heard us playing his song electric, and you could see the gears grinding in his head. It was plain as day. It was like watching a slow-motion lightning bolt."​

    The acoustic Bob Dylan...



    And then the BESTEST version....

    :realfunny:
     
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  3. snache

    snache Should be a custom title here

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    cat2.jpg
     
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  4. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 22, 1944, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the G.I. Bill, an unprecedented act of legislation designed to compensate returning members of the armed services–known as G.I.s–for their efforts in World War II.
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    On this day in 1611, after spending a winter trapped by ice in present-day Hudson Bay, the starving crew of the Discovery mutinies against its captain, English navigator Henry Hudson, and sets him, his teenage son, and seven supporters adrift in a small, open boat. Hudson and the eight others were never seen again.
    :milkcarton:

    On this day in 1945, during World War II, the U.S. 10th Army overcomes the last major pockets of Japanese resistance on Okinawa Island, ending one of the bloodiest battles of World War II. The same day, Japanese Lieutenant General Mitsuru Ushijima, the commander of Okinawa's defense, committed suicide with a number of Japanese officers and troops rather than surrender.
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    On this day in 1783, hearing arguments in the case of the Zong, a slave ship, the Chief Justice of the King's Bench in London states that a massacre of enslaved African "was the same as if Horses had been thrown over board". The crew of the Zong had thrown at least 142 captive Africans into the sea, but the question before the court was not who had committed this atrocity but rather whether the lost "cargo" was covered by insurance. The trial laid bare the horror and inhumanity of the Atlantic slave trade and galvanized the nascent movement to abolish it.
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    On this day in 2011, after 16 years on the run from law enforcement, James "Whitey" Bulger, a violent Boston mob boss wanted for 19 murders, is arrested in Santa Monica, California. The 81-year-old Bulger, one of the FBI's "Ten Most Wanted" fugitives, was arrested with his longtime companion, 60-year-old Catherine Greig, who fled Massachusetts with the gangster in late 1994, shortly before he was to be indicted on federal criminal charges. At the time of his 2011 arrest, there was a $2 million reward for information leading to Bulger's capture, the largest amount ever offered by the agency for a domestic fugitive.
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    On this day in 2001, The Fast and the Furious, a crime drama based in the underground world of street racing in Southern California, debuts in theaters across the United States.
    :shift:

    On this day in 1775, Congress issues $2 million in bills of credit.
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  5. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 23, 1992, the news breaks about the discovery of "Bat Boy." The story was broken in the trusted journal Weekly World News.
    I remember seeing this issue at the grocery store checkout and picked up a copy. If I'd kept it, I could probably sell it today and recap my $.85 plus a hefty bonus since original copies are listed on fleaBay for over $300 right now!
    Enjoy your glimpse of some of the original "fake news"!
    0623BatBoy1.jpeg 0623BatBoy2.jpeg 0623BatBoy3.jpeg

    On this day in 1992, mafia boss John Gotti, who was nicknamed the "Teflon Don" after escaping unscathed from several trials during the 1980s, is sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty on 14 accounts of conspiracy to commit murder and racketeering. Moments after his sentence was read in a federal courthouse in Brooklyn, hundreds of Gotti's supporters stormed the building and overturned and smashed cars before being forced back by police reinforcements.
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    On this day in 1989, Tim Burton's noir spin on the well-known story of the DC Comics hero Batman is released in theaters.
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    On this day in 1934, William Bayly is convicted of murder in New Zealand despite the fact that the body of one of his alleged victims was never found. Most of the evidence against Bayly consisted of trace amounts of human hair, bone and tissue, representing a marked advance in the field of forensics.
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    On this day in 2018, in what started as a fun after-practice excursion, Ekkapol Chantawong, a 25-year-old Thai youth soccer coach, takes his team, the Wild Boars, to explore a cave he'd visited before, intending to stay just about an hour. But when monsoon rains hit while they're underground and the cave's entrance floods, the coach and his 12 players, ages 11-16, become trapped. The team would remain stuck underground for more than two weeks, in what became a global media sensation.
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    On this day in 2013, 34-year-old aerialist Nik Wallenda becomes the first person to walk a high wire across the Little Colorado River Gorge near Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. Wallenda wasn't wearing a safety harness as he made the quarter-mile traverse on a 2-inch-thick steel cable some 1,500 feet above the gorge. In June of the previous year, Wallenda, a member of the famous Flying Wallendas family of circus performers, became the first person to walk a tightrope over Niagara Falls.
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    On this day in 1940, Adolf Hitler surveys notable sites in the French capital, now German-occupied territory.
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    On this day in 1972, Title IX of the education amendments of 1972 is enacted into law. Title IX prohibits federally funded educational institutions from discriminating against students or employees based on sex. It begins: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." As a result of Title IX, any school that receives any federal money from the elementary to university level—in short, nearly all schools—must provide fair and equal treatment of the sexes in all areas, including athletics.
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  6. snache

    snache Should be a custom title here

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    I remember Bat Boy, thought the picture was so fake, neat coincidence though that Batman Movie release.
     
    crogers likes this.
  7. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 24, 1997, U.S. Air Force officials release a 231-page report dismissing long-standing claims of an alien spacecraft crash in Roswell, New Mexico, almost exactly 50 years earlier.
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    On this day in 1973, an arson fire at the UpStairs Lounge, a popular gathering spot for New Orleans' LGBT community in the French Quarter, results in 32 deaths and at least 15 injuries. At the time, it was the deadliest known attack at a gay club in American history. The fire's official cause was "undetermined," and no one was ever arrested for the crime.
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    On this day in 2021, early in the morning, 98 people die when a 12-story, beachfront condominium building collapses in Surfside, Florida, near Miami. The disaster is one of the worst of its kind in U.S. history.
    :pileskulls:

    On this day in 1982, over 20,000 garment workers, almost all of them Asian American women, pack into Columbus Park in New York City's Chinatown. The rally and subsequent march demonstrate the workers' power to the city and the entire garment industry, delivering a decisive victory for the striking workers.
    :strike::strike::strike:

    On this day in 1993, Yale University computer science professor David Gelernter is seriously injured while opening his mail when a padded envelope explodes in his hands. The attack just came two days after a University of California geneticist was injured by a similar bomb and was the latest in a string of bombings since 1978 that authorities believed to be related.
    In the aftermath of the attack on Gelernter, various federal departments established the UNABOM Task Force, which launched an intensive search for the so-called "Unabomber."
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    On this day in 1812, following the rejection of his Continental System by Czar Alexander I, French Emperor Napoleon orders his Grande Armee, the largest European military force ever assembled to that date, into Russia. The enormous army, featuring some 500,000 soldiers and staff, included troops from all the European countries under the sway of the French Empire.
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    On this day in 1997, the Walt Disney Corporation orders one of its subsidiary record labels to recall 100,000 already shipped copies of an album by a recently signed artist—Insane Clown Posse—on the day of its planned release. The issue at hand: the graphic nature of the Detroit "horror-core" rap duo's lyrics.
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    On this day in 1948, one of the most dramatic standoffs in the history of the Cold War begins as the Soviet Union blocks all road and rail traffic to and from West Berlin. The blockade turned out to be a terrible diplomatic move by the Soviets, while the United States emerged from the confrontation with renewed purpose and confidence.
    :cockblocked:
     
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  8. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 25, 1876, Native American forces led by Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer in the Battle of the Little Bighorn near southern Montana's Little Bighorn River.
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    On this day in 1978, activists hoist a vibrant rainbow flag in the midst of the festivities for San Francisco's Gay and Lesbian Freedom Day parade. According to its creator, Gilbert Baker, the crowd immediately recognized the flat's significance: "It completely astounded me that people just got it, in an instant like a bolt of lightning—that this was their flag," he later said. "It belonged to all of us." This was the rainbow Pride flag, now an ubiquitous symbol of queer pride and liberation.
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    On this day in 1996, a tanker truck loaded with 25,000 pounds of explosives rips through the U.S. Air Force military housing complex Khobar Towers in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, killing 19 U.S. airmen and wounding nearly 500 others.
    :sosad:

    On this day in 1988, teenager Debbie Gibson earns a #1 hit with "Foolish Beat."
    Contrary to what some critics of teen pop might imagine, pop sensation Debbie Gibson saw herself not as the next Madonna, but as the next Carole King. And when her single "Foolish Beat" reached the top of the Billboard Hot 100, she achieved something very much in keeping with that goal: She became the youngest person ever to write, produce and perform her own #1 pop single.
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    On this day in 1993, in Ottawa, Kim Campbell is sworn in as Canada's 19th prime minister, becoming the first woman to hold the country's highest office.
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    On this day in 2009, Michael Jackson, one of the most commercially successful entertainers in history, dies at the age of 50 at his home in Los Angeles, California, after suffering from cardiac arrest caused by a fatal combination of drugs given to him by his personal doctor.
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    On this day in 1910, Congress passes the Mann Act, which was ostensibly aimed at keeping young women from being lured into prostitution, but really offered a way to make a crime out of many kinds of consensual sexual activity.
    The Congressional committees that debated the Mann Act did not believe that a woman would ever choose to be a prostitute unless she was drugged and held hostage. The law made it illegal to "transport any woman or girl" across state lines "for any immoral purpose." In 1917, the Supreme Court upheld the conviction of two married California men, Drew Caminetti and Maury Diggs, who had gone on a romantic weekend getaway with their girlfriends to Reno, Nevada, and had been arrested. Following this decision, the Mann Act was used in all types of cases: someone was charged with violating the Mann Act for bringing a woman from one state to another in order to work as a chorus girl in a theater; wives began using the Mann Act against girls who ran off with their husbands. The law was also used for racist purposes: Jack Johnson, heavyweight champion of the world, was prosecuted for bringing a prostitute from Pittsburgh to Chicago, but the motivation for his arrest was public outrage over his marriages to white women.
    The most famous prosecutions under the law were those of Charlie Chaplin in 1944 and Chuck Berry in 1959 and 1961, who took unmarried women across state lines for "immoral purposes." Berry was convicted and spent two years in the prime of his musical career in jail. After Berry's conviction, the Mann Act was enforced only sparingly, but it was never repealed. It was amended in 1978 and again in 1986; most notably, the 1986 amendments replaced the phrase "any other immoral purpose" with "any sexual activity for which any person can be charged with a criminal offense."
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    On this day in 1950, armed forces from communist North Korea smash into South Korea, setting off the Korean War. The United States, acting under the auspices of the United Nations, quickly sprang to the defense of South Korea and fought a bloody and frustrating war for the next three years.
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    On this day in 1965, two Viet Cong terrorist bombs rip through a floating restaurant on the Saigon River. Thirty-one people, including nine Americans, were killed in the explosions. Dozens of other diners were wounded, including 11 Americans.
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    On this day in 1950, an American team composed largely of amateurs defeated its more polished English opponents at the World Cup, held in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Dubbed the "Miracle on Green," the game is considered one of the greatest soccer upsets of all time.
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  9. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy expresses solidarity with democratic German citizens in a speech. In front of the Berlin Wall that separated the city into democratic and communist sectors, he declared to the crowd, "Ich bin ein Berliner" or "I am also a citizen of Berlin."
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    On this day in 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court strikes down Texas' sodomy laws, along with similar laws in 13 other states. The decision in Lawrence v. Texas is a landmark one, reaffirming the existence of a "right to privacy" that is not enumerated in the Constitution and effectively legalizing same-sex sexual activity in the United States.
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    On this day in 2015 marks a major milestone for civil gay rights in the United States, as the Supreme Court announces its decision in Obergefell v. Hodges. By one vote, the court rules that same-sex marriage cannot be banned in the United States and that all same-sex marriages must be recognized nationwide, finally granting same-sex couples equal rights to heterosexual couples under the law.
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    On this day in 1959, in a ceremony presided over by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Queen Elizabeth II, the St. Lawrence Seaway is officially opened, creating a navigational channel from the Atlantic Ocean to all the Great Lakes. The seaway, made up of a system of canals, locks, and dredged waterways, extends a distance of nearly 2,500 miles, from the Atlantic Ocean through the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Duluth, Minnesota, on Lake Superior.
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    On this day in 1945, in the Herbst Theater auditorium in San Francisco, delegates from 50 nations sign the United Nations Charter, establishing the world body as a means of saving "succeeding generations from the scourge of war." The Charter was ratified on October 24, and the first U.N. General Assembly met in London on January 10, 1946.
    So, how's that working out for you?:moarhugs:

    On this day in 1917, during World War I, the first 14,000 U.S. infantry troops land in France at the port of Saint-Nazaire. The landing site had been kept secret because of the menace of German submarines, but by the time the Americans had lined up to take their first salute on French soil, an enthusiastic crowd had gathered to welcome them. However, the "Doughboys," as the British referred to the green American troops, were untrained, ill-equipped, and far from ready for the difficulties of fighting along the Western Front.
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    On this day in 1807, lightning hits a gunpowder factory in the small European country of Luxembourg, killing more than 300 people. Lightning kills approximately 73 people every year in the United States alone, but victims are almost always killed one at a time. The Luxembourg disaster may have been the most deadly lightning strike in history.
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    On this day in 1956, the U.S. Congress approves the Federal Highway Act, which allocates more than $30 billion for the construction of some 41,000 miles of interstate highways; it will be the largest public construction project in U.S. history to that date.
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  10. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 27, 1950, President Harry S. Truman announces that he is ordering U.S. air and naval forces to South Korea to aid the democratic nation in repulsing an invasion by communist North Korea. The United States was undertaking the major military operation, he explained, to enforce a United Nations resolution calling for an end to hostilities, and to stem the spread of communism in Asia. In addition to ordering U.S. forces to Korea, Truman also deployed the U.S. 7th Fleet to Formosa (Taiwan) to guard against invasion by communist China and ordered an acceleration of military aid to French forces fighting communist guerrillas in Vietnam.
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    On this day in 1829, in Genoa, Italy, English scientist James Smithson dies after a long illness, leaving behind a will with a peculiar footnote. In the event that his only nephew died without any heirs, Smithson decreed that the whole of his estate would go to "the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an Establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge." Smithson's curious bequest to a country that he had never visited aroused significant attention on both sides of the Atlantic.
    Six years after his death, his nephew, Henry James Hungerford, indeed died without children, and on July 1, 1836, the U.S. Congress authorized acceptance of Smithson's gift. President Andrew Jackson sent diplomat Richard Rush to England to negotiate for transfer of the funds, and two years later Rush set sail for home with 11 boxes containing a total of 104,960 gold sovereigns, eight shillings, and seven pence, as well as Smithson's mineral collection, library, scientific notes, and personal effects. After the gold was melted down, it amounted to a fortune worth well over $500,000. After considering a series of recommendations, including the creation of a national university, a public library, or an astronomical observatory, Congress agreed that the bequest would support the creation of a museum, a library, and a program of research, publication, and collection in the sciences, arts, and history. On August 10, 1846, the act establishing the Smithsonian Institution was signed into law by President James K. Polk.
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    On this day in 1844, Joseph Smith, the founder and leader of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (more commonly known as Mormonism), is murdered along with his brother Hyrum when a mob breaks into a jail where they are being held in Carthage, Illinois.
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    On this day in 1922, the American Library Association (ALA) awards the first Newbery Medal, honoring the year's best children's book, to The Story of Mankind by Hendrik Willem van Loon. The idea for an award honoring outstanding contributions to children's literature came from Frederic G. Melcher, a former bookseller who in 1918 became an editor of Publisher's Weekly. Over his long career, Melcher often looked for ways to encourage reading, especially among children.
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    On this day in 1940, the Germans set up two-way radio communication in their newly occupied French territory, employing their most sophisticated coding machine, Enigma, to transmit information.
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    On this day in 1939, one of the most famous scenes in movie history is filmed: Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara parting in Gone with the Wind. Director Victor Fleming also shot the scene using the alternate line, "Frankly, my dear, I just don't care," in case the film censors objected to the word "damn." The censors approved the movie but fined producer David O. Selznick $5,000 for including the curse.
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    On this day in 1976, a factory storekeeper in the Nzara township of Sudan becomes ill. Five days later, he dies, and the world's first recorded Ebola virus epidemic begins making its way through the area. By the time the epidemic is over, 284 cases are reported, with about half of the victims dying from the disease.
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    On this day in 1985, after 59 years, the iconic Route 66 enters the realm of history when the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials decertifies the road and votes to remove all its highway signs.
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  11. snache

    snache Should be a custom title here

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    On this day in 1939, one of the most famous scenes in movie history is filmed: Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara parting in Gone with the Wind. Director Victor Fleming also shot the scene using the alternate line, "Frankly, my dear, I just don't care," in case the film censors objected to the word "damn." The censors approved the movie but fined producer David O. Selznick $5,000 for including the curse.

    cat2.jpg
     
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  12. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 28, 1969, sometime after midnight, in what is now regarded by many as history's first major protest on behalf of equal rights for LGBTQ people, a police raid of the Stonewall Inn—a popular gay club located on New York City's Christopher Street—turns violent as patrons and local sympathizers begin rioting against the authorities.
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    On this day in 1992, two of the strongest earthquakes ever to hit California strike the desert area east of Los Angeles. Although the state sits upon the immense San Andreas fault line, relatively few major earthquakes have hit California in modern times. Two of the strongest, but not the deadliest, hit southern California on a single morning in the summer of 1992.
    Just before 5 a.m. on a Sunday morning, a 7.3-magnitude quake struck in Landers, 100 miles east of Los Angeles. Because the Landers area is sparsely populated, damage was relatively minor given the intensity of the jolt. In Los Angeles, residents experienced rolling and shaking for nearly a minute. The tremors were also felt in Arizona, Las Vegas and as far away as Boise, Idaho.
    Just over three hours later, a second 6.3-magnitude tremor hit in Big Bear, not too far from the original epicenter. This quake caused fires to break out and cost three people their lives. A chimney fell on a 3-year-old child and two people suffered fatal heart attacks.
    Between the two quakes, 400 people were injured and $92 million in damages were suffered. The physical damage was also significant. The quakes triggered landslides that wiped out roads and opened a 44-mile-long rupture in the earth, the biggest in California since the 1906 San Francisco quake.
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    On this day in 2006, after a flurry of rumors, DaimlerChrysler chairman Dieter Zetsche announces that the company's urban-focused Smart brand–already popular in Europe–will come to the United States in early 2008.
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    On this day in 2007, the United States removes one of its most commonly-used national symbols from its List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. The de-listing of the bald eagle, which had been close to vanishing from North America around the middle of the 20th century, was one of the most notable wildlife rehabilitation efforts in American history.
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    On this day in 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie are shot to death by a Bosnian Serb nationalist during an official visit to the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo. The killings sparked a chain of events that led to the outbreak of World War I by early August. On June 28, 1919, five years to the day after Franz Ferdinand's death, Germany and the Allied Powers signed the Treaty of Versailles, officially marking the end of World War I.
    :pshoopshoo:

    On this day in 1953, workers at a Chevrolet plant in Flint, Michigan, assemble the first Corvette, a two-seater sports car that would become an American icon. The first completed production car rolled off the assembly line two days later, one of just 300 Corvettes made that year.
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    On this day in 1965, in the first major offensive ordered for U.S. forces, 3,000 troops of the 173rd Airborne Brigade–in conjunction with 800 Australian soldiers and a Vietnamese airborne unit–assault a jungle area known as Viet Cong Zone D, 20 miles northeast of Saigon. The operation was called off after three days when it failed to make any major contract with the enemy.
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    On this day in 1972, President Nixon announces that no more draftees will be sent to Vietnam unless they volunteer for such duty. He also announced that a force of 10,000 troops would be withdrawn by September 1, which would leave a total of 39,000 in Vietnam.
    :yaysmiles:

    On this day in 1997, Mike Tyson bites Evander Holyfield's ear in the third round of their heavyweight rematch. The attack led to his disqualification from the match and suspension from boxing, and was the strangest chapter yet in the champion's roller-coaster career.
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  13. snache

    snache Should be a custom title here

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    On this day in 1992, two of the strongest earthquakes ever to hit California strike the desert area east of Los Angeles. Although the state sits upon the immense San Andreas fault line, relatively few major earthquakes have hit California in modern times. Two of the strongest, but not the deadliest, hit southern California on a single morning in the summer of 1992.
    Just before 5 a.m. on a Sunday morning, a 7.3-magnitude quake struck in Landers, 100 miles east of Los Angeles. Because the Landers area is sparsely populated, damage was relatively minor given the intensity of the jolt. In Los Angeles, residents experienced rolling and shaking for nearly a minute. The tremors were also felt in Arizona, Las Vegas and as far away as Boise, Idaho.
    Just over three hours later, a second 6.3-magnitude tremor hit in Big Bear, not too far from the original epicenter. This quake caused fires to break out and cost three people their lives. A chimney fell on a 3-year-old child and two people suffered fatal heart attacks.
    Between the two quakes, 400 people were injured and $92 million in damages were suffered. The physical damage was also significant. The quakes triggered landslides that wiped out roads and opened a 44-mile-long rupture in the earth, the biggest in California since the 1906 San Francisco quake.

    I remember that well, was just laying in bed for the first one. Went out in the desert plinking later and saw the crack running down the desert.
     
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  14. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 29, 1972, in Furman v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court rules by a vote of 5-4 that capital punishment, as it is currently employed on the state and federal level, is unconstitutional. The majority held that, in violation of the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution, the death penalty qualified as "cruel and unusual punishment," primarily because states employed execution in "arbitrary and capricious ways," especially in regard to race. It was the first time that the nation's highest court had ruled against capital punishment.
    However, because the Supreme Court suggested new legislation that could make death sentences constitutional again, such as the development of standardized guidelines for juries that decide sentences, it was not an outright victory for opponents of the death penalty.
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    On this day in 1995, the American space shuttle Atlantis docks with the Russian space station Mir to form the largest man-made satellite ever to orbit the Earth.
    :astronaut:

    On this day in 1967, blonde bombshell and celebrated actress Jayne Mansfield is killed instantly when the car in which she is riding strikes the rear of a trailer truck on U.S. Route 90 east of New Orleans, Louisiana.
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    On this day in 1613, the Globe Theatre, where most of Shakespeare's plays debuted, burns down.
    :panic:

    On this day in 1969, in the afternoon, a crowd consisting mostly of Black people from the nearby area packs Harlem's Mt. Morris Park (now Marcus Garvey Park). Over the course of this afternoon and the next five Sunday afternoons, Black performers from many different genres and eras appear on the park's brightly-colored, sunlit stage in a dazzling series of shows known as the Harlem Cultural Festival. The festival will draw a total of over 300,000 people.
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    On this day in 1967, Keith Richards sat before magistrates in Chichester, West Sussex, England, facing charges that stemmed from the infamous raid of Richards' Redlands estate five months earlier. Though the raid netted very little in the way of actual drugs, what it did net was a great deal of notoriety for the already notorious Rolling Stones. It was during this raid that the police famously encountered a young Marianne Faithfull clad only in a bearskin rug, a fact that the prosecutor in the case seemed to regard as highly relevant to the case at hand. In questioning Richards, Queen's Counsel Malcolm Morris tried to imply that Faithfull's nudity was probably the result of a loss of inhibition due to cannabis use:
    QC Morris: "Would you agree in the ordinary course of events you would expect a young woman to be embarrassed if she had nothing on but a rug in the presence of eight men, two of whom were hangers-on and the third a Moroccan servant?"
    Richards: "Not at all."
    Morris: "You regard that, do you, as quite normal?"
    Richards: "We are not old men. We are not worried about petty morals."​
    With that one line, Richards emphatically established himself as the spokesman for a generation that did not share the values of the British establishment.
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    On this day in 1958, Brazil defeats host nation Sweden 5-2 to win its first World Cup. Brazil came into the tournament as a favorite, and did not disappoint, thrilling the world with their spectacular play, which was often referred to as the "beautiful game."
    The star of the tournament was an undersized midfielder named Edson Arantes do Nascimento, known the world over as Pelé. Edson, the son of a professional footballer called Dodhino, was named for the American inventor, Thomas Edison.
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  15. snache

    snache Should be a custom title here

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    According to the coroner's report, Mansfield's official cause of death was a "crushed skull with avulsion of cranium and brain"—not decapitation. Despite this documented report, rumors continue to swarm regarding what appeared to be a clump of hair attached to the windshield of the car wreckage, which some people believe to be the blonde bombshell's bouffant wig (as she was not actually a natural blonde and had to frequently bleach her hair). Others speculate that it was either part of her scalp or even her entire head.
    The next time you're driving down the highway and happen to pass a large semi truck, take a look at the long bar that stretches along the back bumper of the vehicle: it's known as "the Mansfield" or the DOT bar.

    When the accident that killed Mansfield occurred, the hood of the small 1966 Buick Electra she was riding in was just the right size to slip underneath the slow-moving semi truck, slicing the top of the car nearly completely off and instantly killing all the passengers in the front seat.

    As a result, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration "made it mandatory for all semi truck trailers to be fitted with under-ride bars... designed to stop a car before it rolls underneath the trailer."
     
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  16. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On June 30, 1520, faced with an Aztec revolt against their rule, forces under the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés fight their way out of Tenochtitlan at heavy cost. Known to the Spanish as La Noche Triste, or "the Night of Sadness," many soldiers drowned in Lake Texcoco when the vessel carrying them and Aztec treasures hoarded by Cortés sank. Montezuma II, the Aztec emperor who had become merely a subject of Cortés in the previous year, was also killed during the struggle; by the Aztecs or the Spanish, it is not known.
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    On this day in 1876, after a slow two-day march, the wounded soldiers from the Battle of the Little Big Horn reach the steamboat Far West.
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    On this day in 1859, Jean Francois Gravelet, a Frenchman known professionally as Charles Blondin, becomes the first daredevil to walk across Niagara Falls on a tightrope. The feat, which was performed 160 feet above the Niagara gorge just down river from the Falls, was witnessed by some 5,000 spectators. Wearing pink tights and a yellow tunic, Blondin crossed a cable about two inches in diameter and 1,100-feet long with only a balancing pole to protect him from plunging into the dangerous rapids below.
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    On this day in 1971, the three Soviet cosmonauts who served as the first crew of the world's first space station die when their spacecraft depressurizes during reentry.
    They left Salyut 1 space station and began reentry procedures. When they fired the explosive bolts to separate the Soyuz 11 reentry capsule from another stage of the spacecraft, a critical valve was jerked open.
    One hundred miles above the earth, the capsule was suddenly exposed to the nearly pressureless environment of space. As the capsule rapidly depressurized, Patsayev tried to close the valve by hand but failed. Minutes later, the cosmonauts were dead. As a result of the tragedy, the Soviet Union did not send any future crews to Salyut 1, and it was more than two years before they attempted another manned mission.
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    On this day in 1936, Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind, one of the best-selling novels of all time and the basis for a blockbuster 1939 movie, is published.
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    On this day in 1989, the writer-director Spike Lee's celebrated third feature film, Do the Right Thing—a provocative drama that takes place on one block in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, on the hottest day of the year—is released in U.S. theaters.
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    On this day in 1981, Glen Godwin, a young business owner, is convicted of murder in Riverside County, California, and sentenced to 26-years-to-life in prison. According to his roommate's testimony, Godwin stomped on, choked, and then stabbed Kim LeValley, an acquaintance and local drug dealer, 28 times before using homemade explosives to blow up his body in the desert near Palm Springs. Godwin, who had no previous record, eventually found his way onto the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List.
    In December 1996, Godwin appeared on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List. Glen Godwin remains at large. He was removed from the Most Wanted List in May 2016.
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    On this day in 1934, in Germany, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler orders a bloody purge of his own political party, assassinating hundreds of Nazis whom he believed had the potential to become political enemies in the future. The leadership of the Nazi Storm Troopers (SA), whose four million members had helped bring Hitler to power in the early 1930s, was especially targeted. Hitler feared that some of his followers had taken his early "National Socialism" propaganda too seriously and thus might compromise his plan to suppress workers' rights in exchange for German industry making the country war-ready.
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    On this day in 1974, considered one of the world's greatest ballet dancers of all time, Soviet virtuoso Mikhail Baryshnikov choreographs his own Cold War-era defection from the U.S.S.R. after four years of planning.
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  17. snache

    snache Should be a custom title here

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    447. Glen Stewart Godwin

    Former Ten Most Wanted Fugitive #447: In March of 1981, Godwin was convicted of murder and robbery, and sentenced to life imprisonment. He escaped from Folsom State Prison in California and fled to Mexico where he was arrested and convicted of trafficking in cocaine. On September 26, 1991, Godwin escaped from Jalisco State Penitentiary shortly before his scheduled release to U.S. authorities. On May 19, 2016, Godwin was removed from the Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List due to the fact that he no longer fit Top Ten criteria.

    Surprised they didn't make a movie or documentary. Hell of an escape artist!
     
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  18. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On July 1, 1997, at midnight, Hong Kong reverts back to Chinese rule in a ceremony attended by British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Prince Charles of Wales, Chinese President Jiang Zemin and U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. A few thousand Hong Kongers protested the turnover, which was otherwise celebratory and peaceful.
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    On this day in 1916, at 7:30 a.m., the British launch a massive offensive against German forces in the Somme River region of France. During the preceding week, 250,000 Allied shells had pounded German positions near the Somme, and 100,000 British soldiers poured out of their trenches and into no-man's-land on July 1, expecting to find the way cleared for them. However, scores of heavy German machine guns had survived the artillery onslaught, and the infantry were massacred. By the end of the day, 20,000 British soldiers were dead and 40,000 wounded. It was the single heaviest day of casualties in British military history. The disastrous Battle of the Somme stretched on for more than four months, with the Allies advancing a total of just five miles.
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    On this day in 1942, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel is brought to a standstill in the battle for control of North Africa. The First Battle of El Alamein begins.
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    On this day in 1863, one of the largest military conflicts in North American history begins when Union and Confederate forces collide at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The epic battle lasted three days and resulted in a retreat to Virginia by Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.
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    On this day in 1898, as part of their campaign to capture Spanish-held Santiago de Cuba on the southern coast of Cuba, the U.S. Army Fifth Corps engages Spanish forces at El Caney and San Juan Hill.
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    Hmmm... seems like a good day for fighting...

    On this day in 1867, the autonomous Dominion of Canada, a confederation of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the future provinces of Ontario and Quebec, is officially recognized by Great Britain with the passage of the British North America Act. July 1 will later become known as Canada Day.
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    On this day in 1979, a device as astonishing on first encounter as the cellular phone or digital camera would later be, the Sony Walkman went on sale for the very first time.
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    On this day in 1984, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which oversees the voluntary rating system for movies, introduces a new rating, PG-13.
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    On this day in 2005, the last Thunderbird, Ford Motor Company's iconic sports car, emerges from a Ford factory in Wixom, Michigan.
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    On this day in 2003, a female employee at a Colorado resort goes to police to file sexual misconduct charges against basketball star Kobe Bryant. A few days later, an arrest warrant was issued for Bryant, and the ensuing case generated a media frenzy.
    On September 1, 2004, after jury selection had begun, the district attorney dropped the rape charge against Bryant because the accuser decided not to testify or participate in the trial. In early March 2005, Bryant and the accuser settled her civil lawsuit against him for an undisclosed sum.
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  19. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On July 2, 1964, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson signs into law the historic Civil Rights Act in a nationally televised ceremony at the White House.
    [​IMG]:yaysmiles:

    On this day in 1944, as part of the British and American strategy to lay mines in the Danube River by dropping them from the air, American aircraft also drop bombs and leaflets on German-occupied Budapest.
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    On this day in 1977, Hollywood composer Bill Conti scores a #1 pop hit with the single "Gonna Fly Now (Theme From Rocky)."
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    On this day in 1839, early in the morning, enslaved Africans on the Cuban schooner Amistad rise up against their captors, killing two crewmembers and seizing control of the ship, which had been transporting them to a life of slavery on a sugar plantation at Puerto Principe, Cuba.
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    On this day in 1937, the Lockheed aircraft carrying American aviator Amelia Earhart and navigator Frederick Noonan is reported missing near Howland Island in the Pacific. The pair were attempting to fly around the world when they lost their bearings during the most challenging leg of the global journey: Lae, New Guinea, to Howland Island, a tiny island 2,227 nautical miles away, in the center of the Pacific Ocean.
    :milkcarton:

    On this day in 1997, the science fiction-comedy movie Men in Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones, opens in theaters around the United States. The film grossed more than $250 million in America alone and helped establish the former sitcom star Will Smith as one of Hollywood's most bankable leading men. Directed by Barry Sonnenfeld (Get Shorty), Men in Black was based on an early 1990s comic book by Lowell Cunningham called The Men in Black.
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    On this day in 1881, only four months into his administration, President James A. Garfield is shot as he walks through a railroad waiting room in Washington, D.C. His assailant, Charles J. Guiteau, was a disgruntled and perhaps deranged office seeker who had unsuccessfully sought an appointment to the U.S. consul in Paris. The president was shot in the back and the arm, and Guiteau was arrested.
    :pshoopshoo:

    On this day in 1947, Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov walks out of a meeting with representatives of the British and French governments, signaling the Soviet Union's rejection of the Marshall Plan. Molotov's action indicated that Cold War frictions between the United States and Russia were intensifying.
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    On this day in 1992, theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking breaks British publishing records when his book A Brief History of Time remains on the nonfiction bestseller list for three and a half years, selling more than 3 million copies in 22 languages.
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  20. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    On July 3, 1890, Idaho is admitted to the union.
    In the summer of 1805, searching for a route over the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River, Lewis and Clark traveled through Idaho with the aid of the Shoshone and their horses. British fur traders and trappers followed a few years later, as did missionaries and a few hardy settlers. As with many remote western states, large-scale settlement began only after gold was discovered. Thousands of miners rushed into Idaho when word of a major gold strike came in September 1860, occupying Indigenous lands. Merchants and farmers followed, eager to make their fortunes "mining the miners." By 1880, Idaho boasted a population of 32,610.
    :welcome_02:

    On this day in 1969, Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones is found dead of an apparent accidental drowning.
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    Two years later, in 1971, Jim Morrison dies of heart failure in a Paris bathtub.
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    Curiously, both were 27 years old. Welcome to the "27 Club"!
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/27_Club

    On this day in 1990, a stampede of religious pilgrims in a pedestrian tunnel in Mecca leaves more than 1,400 people dead. This was at the time the most deadly of a series of incidents over 20 years affecting Muslims making the trip to Mecca.
    To the followers of Islam, traveling to Mecca in Saudi Arabia is known as performing the Hajj. The pilgrimage is one of the five pillars of the religion and must be done at least once in a follower's lifetime, if personal circumstances permit. More than 2 million people make the journey every year. Typically, pilgrims celebrate the feast of Al-Adha and visit the area's many holy sites during their stay.
    :pileskulls:

    On this day in 1989, Martha Ann Johnson is arrested in Georgia for the 1982 murder of her oldest child, Jennyann Wright, after an Atlanta newspaper initiated a new investigation into her suspicious death. Johnson's three other children had also mysteriously died between 1977 and 1982.
    In 1989, Johnson was arrested. She quickly confessed that she had smothered Jennyann and James as they slept by sitting on them (she weighed more than 250 pounds), but denied responsibility for the other two deaths.
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    On this day in 1863, on the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, Confederate General Robert E. Lee's last attempt at breaking the Union line ends in disastrous failure, bringing the most decisive battle of the American Civil War to an end.
    The Battle of Gettysburg was the turning point in the Civil War, costing the Union 23,000 killed, wounded, or missing in action. The Confederates suffered some 25,000 casualties.
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    On this day in 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signs the Rivers and Harbors Flood Control Bill, which allocates funds to improve flood-control and water-storage systems across the country. Eisenhower had sent back two earlier bills to Congress, but was pleased with the revisions included in Senate Bill 3910.
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