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Narrowed it down to...

24thMED Feb 20, 2009

  1. 24thMED

    24thMED Down For Life

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    Ubuntu or openSuse. Which linux distro would you recommend and why? Thanks...
     
  2. Borongas

    Borongas Smokes Rocks

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    Graphically I like SUSE but if you want stuff to just work and don't want to have to sit there for hours hacking away then Ubuntu is pretty cool.
     
  3. VampyreWolf

    VampyreWolf Prime minister of coffee Brigade Member

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    I really got back into linux with ubuntu 6.10, because it just worked and I had to spend less time tweaking my system to get it to work.

    opensuse has more available for tweaking, and the only issues I had was my wireless card took some tweaking and I had to manually get media to play (by default they don't include the codecs for mp3 or video playback or have an easy install package with em).

    What really makes the difference is that opensuse lets you install xen (vmware equivilent) by default, and the virtual terminals work without any tweaking.
     
  4. 24thMED

    24thMED Down For Life

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    Thanks. "just works" is what I was looking for so I guess I'll give ubuntu a try...
     
  5. Borongas

    Borongas Smokes Rocks

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    Ubuntu 6.10 had little to no VMware support, in the newer flaves of Ubuntu VMWare Server and Player are "apt-get" able.

    Don't forget Ubuntu likes "sudo su -" and not "su" for some reason... Give Kubuntu a try also you might like it, once Ubu is installed just "apt-get Kubuntu Desktop" and that should do it.


    :popcorn:
     
  6. VampyreWolf

    VampyreWolf Prime minister of coffee Brigade Member

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    forget sudo commands... use sudo bash and not worry about it timing out.

    The difference between the gnome and kde desktops is how easily you want to find your settings to tweak. You can get to the same options through gnome, it just takes some digging to find a few of em. KDE (turning it into kubuntu) has it all accessible from the main menu and is more familiar to windows users (the rest of my family is all firmly planted in windows as long as I help fix it but can use a kde copy of opensuse easier than a gnome copy).

    The newer copies of ubuntu have compiz (used to be beryl) installed by default, but only enabled if your vid card supports it. And if you go through synaptic and enable all repositories you will find a lot of packages to play with.

    I'll save you a headache... This is your bible irregardless of which distro you end up with, and for picking up the tricks in ubuntu without banging your head for 6 months, pick up these two. The sams series of books will save you some trouble, and has these two depending on how basic you need it taken down to.
    I've got 17 linux books on my shelves, covering Ubuntu, openSUSE, and Fedora, as well as for Samba and programming. I found out about a local linux users group about 6 months in, after I had finally figured it out myself between books and forums. I figure that by not giving microsoft cash for an operating system I can put the same cash towards my library and not have it all suddenly stop working in 3-4 years.

    I'd recommend dual booting your computer for a couple weeks till you figure the basics out, then seeing how long you can go before booting back to windows from frustration as you try to learn. If you're only using windows for games, learn how to set up VMware or use wine to play within linux. Might take a couple months to find everything in synaptic but 99% of what you do in windows can be done in linux for free (or close to).
     
  7. VampyreWolf

    VampyreWolf Prime minister of coffee Brigade Member

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    Here's a group down in san francisco to save you the hunting. Even just getting on the mailing list will help with questions you have, and usually someone will be willing to give hands on help for issues.

    The meetings for the slg (the group here) are pretty much a free flow of information exchange. Meet for coffee once a month, and any linux problems are taken care of quickly or arrangements are made to fix them quickly... though just asking the mailing group usually fixes the issue in a couple days. It's an eccentric group to someone new, with a professor, a couple teachers, and then just about someone from each industry here... with the central goal to use linux and introduce it to new people. Topics at our coffee nights cover just about anything.

    Simply joining a forum and asking a question will usually be met with a few RTFM comments ("read the fucking manual") but I've never gotten that with the local group. The standard process is to swear at it, poke in the system, try to find the answer online, and finally ask the local group for help. Odds are that a million other people have had the same problem at some point but want you to learn the answer without being given it (give a man a fish... )
     
  8. 24thMED

    24thMED Down For Life

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    Thank you very much for the information...

    I spent the evening downloading ubuntu and loading it on a laptop. I had an old disk drive for the laptop so I replaced the current drive to keep it just windows and formatted and installed windows then ubuntu on the old drive. Now my laptop can run either ubuntu or windows...

    I don't have any experience with linux but have been working on Unix for the last couple of years. I'm used to the command line and so far this looks a lot like windows... Took a few minutes to find the wireless connection setup stuff... The whole reason I did this is I'm taking a class on Spring/Hibernate frameworks. I was going to do the class project at work on Unix but I got laid off a few weeks ago so I needed/wanted a unix environment for the project.

    Now that ubuntu is up and running, I will start exploring this distro...

    Thanks again for the suggestions, info, and links...
     
  9. VampyreWolf

    VampyreWolf Prime minister of coffee Brigade Member

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    Always happy to help where I can.

    I started playing with linux back with knoppix 2.4.something with the livecd as my windows troubleshooting environment. Played with at least a dozen distros over the years and finally had enough of windows breaking itself. Heard about ubuntu and how it was trying to make it more user friendly and went from there (have used from 6.10 through 8.10, waiting to see what 9.04 brings).

    With how often I still grab my MS-DOS 3.3 command book, the linux command reference will always be useful (especially when I get back into programming again).

    When I get samba figured out in opensuse, I'm wiping windows off 5 computers here. Ubuntu won't boot in my main server but opensuse 10.3 does without an issue.
     

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