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Kitchen Knives

Rene E. Roy Dec 23, 2006

  1. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    You will Love the steel.

    I would have gone for a little longer blade but a 5inch will get the job done for you.

    I find a 7 inch more useful but most real enthusiasts like the longer blades --- more like 10 inches.

    Mike
     
  2. clavichord

    clavichord Huge member

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    BRKT Parer, again

    In another thread, I had talked about my BRKT parer recommendation already. Over the weekend, I cooked something that makes me repeat that recommendation. I was cooking lamb kidneys with a mustard and cream sauce. For each person, I had three kidneys. What you do is you take off the skin, halve them lengthwise, and now from each of those halves you have to remove the knot of fat in the middle. Those kidneys are small, they are wobbly, and you have to be careful because you want to keep them intact and not cut into the meaty part.
    With the Parer, I just had to grab the fat with two fingers, lift it a little bit, and barely without pressure the knife would cut the fat away. Just for comparison, I tried several of my other small kitchen knives, and none of them would work with such ease. The knife's secret is its belly which allows you to work with a minute rocking motion while grabbing the steel directly; the result is a surgical success without the application of force.
    :viking:
    Michael
     
  3. ziperian

    ziperian Little member

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    I have cutco and many japanesse, german kitchen knives. It's all good. I use the cutco's in a very unilitarian usage, many are serrated. I like em. I have some japanesse high rock/ supposedly 60-62 and they slice meat like paper. I have the meridian elite german knives and buddy if you drop them on a chicken it falls in half and your blade will not bend. I like sharp tools period. All of these knives are only used once the heavy work is complete in the field and to make a sannich.
     
  4. RNST

    RNST Entrusted Devil Super Moderator

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    7" Santoku Knife is probably the one I grab first. Other than paring knives, of course.

    Recently I was talking about sharpening steels with my butcher. They have been using with a lot of success the diamond coated oval shaped steels.

    Anyone have any experience with these steels?

    Good - Bad ?



    :decisions
     
  5. watercrawl

    watercrawl Enormous member

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    I've never used one, and I never will on my knives. So, I cannot comment directly, but what exactly are you wanting out of the diamond steel? What kind of knives do you plan to mutilate....errrr, use on it?

    As I understand the diamond steels, most are pretty aggressive in their grit rating and they will leave a rather rough edge...particularly when new before the diamonds have been knocked down. Diamonds, obviously, will remove metal from the edge....so, a diamond "steel" isn't really a steel at all....it's more of a sharpening device. A "steel" is not meant to remove metal....only to realign the rolled edge on soft western knives.

    There are, however, a ton of different "steels" available made from glass, ceramic, diamond coated, smooth, grooved, etc. and each is used for a different application. I would never use any on my knives....but I do use a ceramic hone/steel on the knives my wife uses with good results.
     
  6. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    I could not have said that Better.


    :madaddy:
     
  7. watercrawl

    watercrawl Enormous member

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    Great minds!! :ssmile:
     
  8. bfm

    bfm Should read BMF a new type of Strider

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    I jus got my first Santoku style knives. I grabbed two seconds from the Lamson Sharp factory store. The only problem I saw with either was that they were poorly sharpend. Put good edges on both and have really been enjoying them. The make a nice addition to my collection of varous German kitchen knives.
     
  9. RNST

    RNST Entrusted Devil Super Moderator

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    Ok, thanks for the feedback. Just checking cause this butcher shop is a more of a production environment. Cutting for Hotels, Restaurants and selling to the public. They can afford to buy lots of butcher's knives every year.

    I have my ceramic sharpeners and ceramic rod which keeps my kitchen knives sharp. I am always on the lookout for something that might help me keep an edge a bit longer. Perhaps I am trying to take the easy way and not have to sharpen so much :D





    :jdposts:
     
  10. stephanfowler

    stephanfowler knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    ok,

    but what about a nessmuck????


    seriously though, this thread was a great read and really helped me sort out a couple designs of my own.
     
  11. falcon125

    falcon125 the express train to mayhem Brigade Member

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    I got a diamond "steel" for Christmas 4 years ago. I love it, a few light swipes of the blade and your back to slicing & dicing.
    No its not a steel, but it is quick in the kitchen.
     
  12. waterdogs

    waterdogs Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    I`ve had a full block of Wusthof Trident Classic for about 20 years....always been satisfied with their performance. Then,around 10 years ago, while shopping in a restaurant supply store, I saw some Global knives in the showcase. After handling them, I bought a 7-inch Chef`s knife and a small parer. Their thin blades were like surgical instruments, working very well on meats & vegetables. A little harder to maintain than the German blades, but not bad.
    I use an old DMT diamond "steel" which is pretty worn down, a ceramic rod, and a strop to finish `em up.
     
  13. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    I always say that folks should get any kind of knife they want and sharpen it any way they want.

    Kitchen knives are thin and should have very radical geometry - usually less than 15 degrees.

    Common Ceramic Hones - Rough Kitchen Steels and Diamond Steels or Hones are common if you have never actually had a sharp kitchen knife in your hand.

    All of the above do NOT sharpen your kitchen knife.

    They just "Impart Tooth so that the knife seems sharp because you are just putting on a sharp WIRE.

    That toothy wire will grab a tomato and slice it very thin - a few times.

    As you use it - it hits the cutting board and the little teeth break off - the knife seems to get dull so you hit it again on the Steel-hone-ceramic-diamond-etc again.

    You are constantly imparting new teeth as you prepare a meal.

    A truly sharp kitchen knife will fall through a Tomato from it's own weight - it will cut for hours because the edge has no shards of carbide sticking out so that hair splitting edge is not easily effected by the work or the board.

    I have said this a number of times so it is obvious to me that I am pissing into the wind on this.

    Look at my posts on this and Adam's (Watercrawl) on this and you will see that we are consistent on this.

    Keep in mind that Adam is the Moderator of the highest rated kitchen knife forum on this planet and none of those folks would ever use a Steel or a Diamond hone on their knives.

    Kitchen steels should be sold in sets of 6.

    They make great Tent pegs.
     
  14. 2fulhundin

    2fulhundin Official Retard

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    quoted for truth.
     
  15. 50calmike

    50calmike 50 caliber Devil

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    After getting a hands on tutorial from Mike Stewart on the proper use of a leather hone, I can say that my kitchen knives are scary sharp now. I have several Henckles knives and they are REAL soft, but with a little time on the hone/strop with compound, I can cut for quite a while before they slow down. I use around a 20-25 degree final edge because of how soft they are and it works great, for me.
     
  16. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    Mike,

    As You found out - the German knives have to be left at well over 20 degrees because they are so soft.

    They will just not support a 15 degree bevel.

    To support a 15- Bevel the blade has be be at least 58rc.(real 58 not bullshit 58) The harder the blade the more radical you can go with the sharpening.
     
  17. 50calmike

    50calmike 50 caliber Devil

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    Yeah, I definitely have to keep them at that steep angle. I tried to keep them a bit more shallow, but they all rolled, at the time I bought them, I was a real novice with knives. I just figured you get what you pay for and I really didn't know how to sharpen properly.

    Now I don't mean to bring Cutco back into this thread, but the only one I have is a 9" bread knife. It works fine for that.
    Several friends have whole sets of them and swear by them, but I refuse to use those steak knives or any serrated knife on steak. If I need a saw to cut my steak, I ain't eating it.:devil1:
     
  18. Mr.LaBella

    Mr.LaBella ←The № 1 Devil→ Administrator

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    RIP Rene, let's do some kitchen knife talkin though!

    WE need answers, your input, your definitions!
     
  19. Linos

    Linos baliholickydexbender JDBA Official Member Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    very interesting read...i could only go till post 250 i have to come back and read the rest...
    this is my most used kitchen knife otehr than the chef`s knife:
    [​IMG]
    it`s not expensive but it got the job done...
     
  20. RRLOVER

    RRLOVER Knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Such a true statement.......To the OP...There is a bunch of American and Canadian kitchen knife makers out there doing some quality work,this forum posts from some.
     

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