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Kitchen Knives

Rene E. Roy Dec 23, 2006

  1. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    Adam,

    The Two I'm talking about were the two that were auctioned off( I think it was Ryan) for one of the Kitchen forum Get together Events.

    They were both Damascus.

    One was a Chef and the Other was a Nakiri.

    I had to re-do the handles and pins.

    They were thin on the edge but very heavy in the hand.

    They felt like Clubs to me compared to the knives I'm use to.

    Mike
     
  2. watercrawl

    watercrawl Enormous member

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    Mike -

    I assumed those were the two you were referring to.

    I've heard a lot of complaints about his Western style (i.e. full tang, bolster) handles. Way too big, poor fit & finish, much thicker than his other lines, etc. These are issues that you shouldn't have in a $600ish (and higher) dollar kitchen knife.
     
  3. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    I know that I should not have had to fix them.

    I was so Weirded Out about it-- I never even charged Ryan for doing it.


    Mike
     
  4. markd

    markd Little member

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    Thin kitchen knives are ideal...for me.
    Kramer makes a great looking knife, but I've never used one. Light, thin, and sharp as fuck is what I need in a kitchen knife.
     
  5. MadDaddy

    MadDaddy Pat in the box

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    Calphalon Katana for $24.99

    I figured what the hell, I'll give it a try.

    The wife and I had to go to the Local Bed Bath and Beyond yesterday to pick up some humidifier filters, new shower curtain and a few other odd's-n-ends. So I walk over by the knife area to take a look and I see they have a couple of the Calphalon Katana series knives on sale.

    I decided to pick up the 5.5 inch Honesuki and see how I like it. I was only 24.99 so I figured I can't really go wrong. It's relatively thin and uses a VG1 core, seems to have a pretty good edge on it (better than I expected), but I plan on polishing it a bit. I have used plenty of VG10 before but never VG1, so ew'll see how it goes.
     
  6. jzmtl

    jzmtl Huge member

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    What do you guys think about spyderco's yang kitchen knife? I'm used to use chinese cleaver not chef's knife (yes I know yang is not chef's knife but I'm more talking about the blade style).
     
  7. Komodo

    Komodo entertainment coordinator Brigade Member

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    I say go for it! I'd like to see something like that, I think it would be perfect for me.

    The other day I finally broke down and bought my very first Santoku. I've been curious to see what everybody else had been raving about this style knife. For me, a good Chef's knife, and a small parer, do 99% of my food prep, and I have been very happy with them.

    The first task I put my new Santoku to was carving up a couple of roasted chickens. I have to admit, it did a better job than my Chef's knife, and I was duly impressed.
    Yesterday, I used it to make a beef stew. Cutting up the beef into cubes was a breeze, BUT..........when it came time for the veggies (carrots, celery, & potatoes) it didn't preform nearly as well as my Chef's!

    Mike, if you can combine the best features of both knives into one, you'll be running your shop 24/7 and still won't be able to keep up with demand! :manganr:
     
  8. watercrawl

    watercrawl Enormous member

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    What kind of chef's knife do you have Komodo?
     
  9. Komodo

    Komodo entertainment coordinator Brigade Member

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    10" Wusthof Classic.

    The parring knife I use, and I use it ALOT, is a Bark River Mini-Northstar.

    A 12" Wusthof Carver, and 12" Golden Hampster Bread Knife, round out the rest of what I really use. I've got a another half-dozen or so other knives that just sit in the block collecting dust.
     
  10. watercrawl

    watercrawl Enormous member

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    The santoku you bought is likely quite a bit thinner than the Wusthof chef's knife.

    It's weird that you like the chef's knife for veggie prep and the santoku for meat duties as that's about exactly opposite of what is typical. People usually find that the thinness of the santoku lends to superb cutting for hard veggies like carrots, potato's, etc. While a large, thick chef's knife like you have makes those cuts more like wedging and breaking instead of cutting.

    I wonder if you wouldn't like the heft of the chef's knife, with the thinness of that santoku for all around duties?!?! You might want to try something like a 240mm (9.5") Togiharu Moly gyuto from korin:

    http://korin.com/Molybdenum-Gyutou?sc=7&category=17363

    for your next knife. It will be really thin like the santoku...but obviously a bit heavier due to it's size. For $66 + $7 shipping, it's a hard deal to beat. If you don't like it, it's an easy sell in the Kitchen at KF.
     
  11. Komodo

    Komodo entertainment coordinator Brigade Member

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    From handle to tip, the Chef's starts out the very slightest bit thicker, for about an inch only. The Santoku spine doesn't taper and ends up thicker than the Chef's.
    The Santoku in question is a Faberware Contemporary. An inexpensive, but surprisingly well made knife. Although, I don't think Faberware got the design of the belly of the knife quite right???
    I used it again last night to carve up a London Broil and it did a fantastic job. A single "draw" across the meat for a clean-cut slice. It was like using a razorblade utility knife!
    It's didn't fare so well preping the veggies. I watched the blade closely, and the position of the belly doesn't allow me the "rocking" motion I'm used to with the Chef's.

    Alll in all, I can't complain. I'm VERY happy with it as a meat knife! :cheesydevil:



    I checked out that Gyutou (thank's for the link!). It doesn't scream "BUY ME!" to me, but if it did, I'd go for the 8.2", left handed model.
     
  12. JackBlades

    JackBlades former cerveca terminador

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    Sebenza.

    Just kidding. We have a fat block full of J.A. Henckles 5-star knives. My fave is the Santoku that I got to fill the last slot in the block. Learn the Bobby Flay method of veggie/herb dicing and live well!

    I can cook you up some grub you wouldn't forget.
     
  13. watercrawl

    watercrawl Enormous member

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    The "left handed" version is the same knife, but they charge you extra to switch the asymetrical bevel to the left side. You can do it yourself if you know how. It's simple as sin and will take 10 minutes.

    And a santoku is not meant to "rock" cut. It will have very little belly and is meant to be a push cutting knife....like a Chinese cleaver kind of.
     
  14. Komodo

    Komodo entertainment coordinator Brigade Member

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    I think I'm getting the hang of the Santoku!
    Last night I made chicken frajitas. Sliced up the chicken with the the San, then went to grab the Chef for the peppers & onions when that little "lightbulb" went off over my head. I'd been using a draw cut on the meats and LOVING the preformance, why not try that with the veggies. I did, and it worked out great on the peppers, and good enough on the onion.

    With a little more practice on my part, I think the Santoku will take it's place with the "most used" knives in my kitchen. It won't take the place of my Chef's knife, but it will see plenty of action.
     
  15. okbohn

    okbohn knives ship free Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    But wouldn't that ruin the newspaper?
     
  16. Tracker

    Tracker Huge member

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    Dang that was a long read, this whole thread took me a little over 3 hurs to read it all:devilzeek My thoughts are has BRKT changed to flat grinding a covex on the whole kitchen series? After reading this through I would say that would make the whole set killer and all of the knives identical when sharpening leading to greater user satisfaction IMO. Now to go hunt them.....
     
  17. ponte

    ponte JDBA4L JDBA Official Member

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    Wow! What an education I just received from reading this thread. The more I read the less I realized I knew about knives. Great stuff guys! I'll be looking to upgrade my kitchen knives in the near future for sure.
     
  18. clavichord

    clavichord Huge member

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    BRKT Carver (crosspost from a Knife Discussion thread)

    I do hope that dual posting doesn't violate any rules, but as not everybody might read all threads I considered it suiting this very thread.

    Just recently, I got my Carver, exactly this one: http://barkriverknives.com/albums/al...Af_Blkwd_s.jpg
    It has in the meantime become one of my most used kitchen knives, and that means a lot from somebody like me who uses cleavers as his dominant knives. It hasn't crowded out the cleavers, but it has crowded out the smaller knives, which, given its impressive size, is quite a feat.

    Last Sunday, I made a calf's kidney, and as always the task at hand was getting rid of the fat, all of it, because the kidney slices get only one minute each of heat on both sides, and that is not enough to cook any fat, so it has to go. Usually the tool for that task is my BRKT parer, as I have explained earlier in this thread, but this time I tried the carver, and it was much more efficient. The reason is the upswept tip, and that the power transmission when pressing down vertically is much more direct. This, the superior sharpness of the polished edge, and the sheer weight of the carver made the removal of the fat child's play.

    But the real surprise came yesterday. I have this fish wholesaler in a neighbouring town who delivers to all the sushi chefs in the Rhein-Main-area, and when you enter the shop there is the whole sea at display, but you don't smell any fish, you just smell salt water. The fish is so fresh it is still bleeding. I had driven to him because I wanted to make sashimi for dinner, and the fish I bought was tuna, monk fish, and wolffish. The wolffish fillet was with skin, so I had to put it skin down on the board, and with the carver it was very easy to pry the flesh away, although it was still fiercely sticking to the skin. Of course I have a long Japanese sashimi knife, but the carver's thickness made it easier to act as a sharp wedge without cutting into the skin. Making thin slices of all the fish with different densities (the tuna relatively solid, the wolffish elastic, the monk fish soft) was extremely easy, easier than with my sashimi knife, because on these long knives the power wanes the more you pull them towards you, while the carver's upswept edge will keep the leverage impact constant. Without having tried it yet, I feel reasonably sure that you can use this carver for preparing carpaccio without pre-freezing the fillet of beef.
    I even prepared the long thin strands of shredded radish with it. You peel off slices of radish with a peeler, roll up each slice, and then you cut very fine strands from this roll. You need a very sharp knife for that, because otherwise you only squeeze and break that roll, and with the carver it went like it was especially made for it.
    All in all, I think BRKT has created a tool here that deserves to be used for more than carving Thanksgiving turkeys.
    :viking:
    Michael
     
  19. SPLITSHOT

    SPLITSHOT Paracord Pimp

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    We have a full set of Wusthof Classic's my wife loves them .they sharpen very easy and hold an edge very well .they are well balanced ....
     
  20. dave43

    dave43 Little member

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    Great thread...I just ordered a Santoku and pairing knife from JJS Knives, a maker from Denmark. The steel used is Sandvik 12C27 hardened to 60 rockwell. The Santoku is 5 inches. i would be interested in Mike Stewarts thoughts on this steel and size.
     

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