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Kai Gunto sword Ichihari Nagamitsu

bubba-san Oct 12, 2013

  1. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    This is a Kai Gunto sword By Ichihari Nagamitsu. His swords are famous for their cutting ability and pretty rare . I am polishing this blade at the present time , and I will post up some pics when finished
    Bubba-san

    More information on swordsmith.

    http://home.earthlink.net/~steinrl/naga.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2013
  2. Clint

    Clint Advocatus Diaboli

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    That is a SWEET blade!
     
  3. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Thanks Clint,

    It should look much better after Polish . quite a bit of surface rust.

    I can easily remove it, and make that hamon pop out like crazy.
     
  4. norcal13

    norcal13 rated "e" for evil Brigade Member

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    will that affect the value?

    i know cleaning my WWII knives would devalue them.

    is it the same with swords?
     
    Mr.LaBella likes this.
  5. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Good point .Usually anything antique is devalued when you restore it especially guns
    furniture, and Knives .... the exception is Nihonto ( Japanese antique swords & blades) They are one of the few antiques that actually increase in value .

    It also depends on the value of the sword and who the maker is .
    What I am trying to say is you would not want to restore a sword that does not have the base value . Most WW2 swords should be left as is .

    This particular sword has good base value of around $3750.

    after polish maybe $5500 ? Sometimes more on a good day at auction.

    What is so darn prohibitive about sword restoration is the cost of good polish $100 per inch down to 65 $ per inch .

    If you have a sword that is 27" ( cutting edge ) it could potentially cost

    2700 $ for a good art polish . Regards Bubba


    Ps thats the main reason I learned to do them myself .........
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2013
  6. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    A little polish goes a long way!

    Here are a couple pics from about 4 hrs of waterstone polishing

    I still have a long way to go . As I progress in the polish the stone grit will get very fine , up to 20-30 k grit. This type of polish will be a traditional type Sashikomi nugui polish . there are several types including hadori , Kesho and a few more . I would take my old butt
    3-4 months to do it completely. But this will be a kaji -toji ( rough polish) for the present. The fine the stone the more the hamon will
    brighten . Usually abrade the polishing stones with another softer stone the makes a slurry that is alkaline that polishes the steel but also etches the hamon to help brighten . There are other things you can do to brighten even more . Will show that as the polishing progresses. Thanks Bubba
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2013
    konger likes this.
  7. firebolt

    firebolt Hollandse Duivel Brigade Member

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    nice

    that is a lot off work.
    is the polishing style you do original to the sword ?
    or do you think a other style would suet the blade better

    is this a Kabutowari tested blade ?
     
  8. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I try to follow the original profile and polish it the way the original smith
    intended . Nagamitsu tried to copy an earlier period , which may have meant he polished in the sashikoma style ? The true Japanese old timers prefered it..

    What I am attempting, is to establish a basic foundation / profile as original as I can .

    I do not know if this sword in particular was used for helmet cutting

    but, there are some scratches in that area where it would be cut ?

    If so, it would be extremely hard to prove I think ?

    If I could prove it , would change the calculas for sure .
    A lot of his swords were used for competition . It's something for me to think of . Thanks for the thought........ Bubba


    Although a really good hadori art polish / kesho style would be pretty nice . that would take quite a while !

    the Kissaki is somewhere between cho kissaki and and O kissaki its pretty long ......
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2013
  9. itadakimasu

    itadakimasu There are no kangaroos in Austria! JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Amazing progress, I really enjoy seeing and hearing storys about polishing a katana. I saw some videos once and it looks like it may some time, my deepest respect!
     
    bubba-san likes this.
  10. Obijuan Kenobe

    Obijuan Kenobe Our only hope! Brigade Member

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    Nice thread, Bubba.

    And fabulous blade.

    Still have a hard time imagining days when this was the currency for settling disputes.

    Hard men and hard knives.

    obi
     
    bubba-san likes this.
  11. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Feudal Japan was a strange place . I mean it was like millions of Hatfields and mcCoys . Their fighting was very ritualistic , one guy would set on his horse and read a long rolled scroll , telling the other samurai across valley also on horse what he did to cause this battle and the other samurai would tell him about being son of pigs and so on . I t could go on for days . belittleing and disrespecting one another before any action would happen . It was usually swift and brutal.

    there are also many large battles on horse back . There were also foot soldiers with naginata and big Ken swords ,Tachi . And all dressed up for the Battle . It must have been quite a scene .

    The losers were all decapitated ... usually . By the way anyone who has any old japanese prints , I like to collect them . especially the battle scenes..... thats another story...... Bubba-san
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 14, 2013
  12. mag1

    mag1 No More Mr. Nice Guy Brigade Member

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    Thanks for the thread and pics!

    Where can you find these for sale?
     
  13. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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  14. mag1

    mag1 No More Mr. Nice Guy Brigade Member

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  15. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Buying swords is very tough.

    You have to rely on the seller if you are buying online .

    Most of the japanese weapons I own were bought on a picture or two.

    The shape and condition can be subjective and because they usually cost good money it's wise to really research your sources . Be very wary of ebay sales . There are a few good seller's just be aware .

    I know a sight I believe is in south Africa or France or both ?
    you can buy swords from the members and the other members who some are japanese historians and real experts on what to buy and what not.

    Quite a few japanese appraisers and dealers. I have been fortunate
    Have bought only 1-2 fakes in my life Bubba-san


    Lots of historiams and also some newbs http://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/



    http://home.earthlink.net/~steinrl/military.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 14, 2013
  16. mag1

    mag1 No More Mr. Nice Guy Brigade Member

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    Thanks, that's why i asked..I know there is a lot of fakes. I am reading some stuff off the Nihonto message board for some education.
    Goal is to have one by Christmas..
     
  17. firebolt

    firebolt Hollandse Duivel Brigade Member

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    as much as i really like Japanese swords.
    i try to learn much about theme, but the study is very intense, and very defined, a many times polished cracked one can be more value than a mint piece....
    and impurities in the steel, can be acceptable as the are from a specific time period

    i learned so far, not to buy one with out consulting a friend who is member off the Dutch Japanese Sword collecting association.

    nice pictures Bubba-san
     
  18. AJD1

    AJD1 Prince Of Darkness Brigade Member

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    :iagree:

    Hubba-Bubba,thats a beautiful piece man!:thumbsup:
     
    bubba-san likes this.
  19. bubba-san

    bubba-san Katanakaji Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    You are so correct , I read about swords as much as I can , education about the sword is your best defense . Nihonto is a great site .

    we never stop learning thats the beauty in collecting swords .. Bubba



    PS I soon will post pictures of method I use to establish a basic Yakote line and Kissaki ..... Part traditional and part hybrid.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 15, 2013

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