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Grinding without a belt grinder

Terrapin83 Mar 26, 2019

  1. Terrapin83

    Terrapin83 Little Member

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    Okay... before I get too much further into this project, I need a little advice. This is my first attempt at a hand forged blade. I still need to do a bit more cleanup on the tang and smooth out the spine and cutting edge, but after that it's on to the grind. The problem is I don't have a belt grinder atm, and would still like to have as smooth of a grind as I can on this. Tools at my disposal include: angle grinders, bench grinder, cutoff tools (with grinding wheel attachments), files, various sandpapers, bench vise, among other various mechanic's tools. So my question I guess is this... What would be the best way (with the tools mentioned above) to go about trying to get a smooth flat grind (full flat grind from edge to spine) on this knife? TIA DSCN4239lq.jpg
     
    Rio and Jim L. like this.
  2. Sparks

    Sparks Tiny Member

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    I'd clamp in the vise, start with the files to establish the full bevels then finish with sandpaper. Sandpaper needs to be mounted to a hard backer that is preferably as flat as possible. Nice even pressure pull strokes with the hard backer will give you a full flat with a straight grained satin finish.
     
    Jim L. likes this.
  3. Terrapin83

    Terrapin83 Little Member

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    Started the grind. Ended up going with a 6 inch sanding disc for the main bevel start. It got a bit wonky in a couple spots, especially near the tip, which also got a bit too thin, so I'll definitely have to rework that area, but it's a start and I'll end up doing some hand filing/sanding later on anyway to make sure it's nice and smooth all the way down the blade. Really need to get the belt grinder going and this would be a lot easier, but sometimes you just gotta work with what you got. Good thing is that this is just for personal use anyway, so if I make a few small mistakes on my first knife I can just chock it up to a learning experience. Kitchen knife grind start lq.jpg
     
    seandavid55 likes this.
  4. Terrapin83

    Terrapin83 Little Member

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    Grind update... Smoothed out the grind a bit today, took the thinned out area off the tip, hit the grind with some 120 grit paper and shined the spine area real quick with some 1500 just to better show the grind line. It's still not perfect, but it's getting there. Kitchen knife grind update.jpg
     
    Jim L. and jimmyjo like this.
  5. jimmyjo

    jimmyjo Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Looks great, check out Jeremy Valentine on Facebook. He did use angle grinders for most knives and still feels like he removes faster with be than a 2X72 grinder.
     
    Jim L. likes this.
  6. Sparks

    Sparks Tiny Member

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    I've seen some vids of guys working magic with angle grinders. I cant, but that's the user not the tool.
     
    Jim L. likes this.
  7. Terrapin83

    Terrapin83 Little Member

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    I ended up doing most of the work with a 6" disc sander then hand sanded. Here's the finished product. DSCN4330lq.jpg
     
    Rio, jimmyjo, Jim L. and 1 other person like this.
  8. Jim L.

    Jim L. knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I wish I could down load pics here. My phone won't talk nicely to the forum servers. I always get an "Error: file too large" message.

    Any who, good job on the knife. @Sparks has excelent advice.

    I would only add that you start with a coarse file to flatten out the surface, draw guidelines for the bevel shoulders then a center line for the cutting edge (actually 2 lines about 1/32 of an inch apart straddling the center line).

    File away till there's a flat between the shoulder and edge lines. Repeat with a fine file to remove the coarse scratches left by the ciarse file.

    Then attack it with the sanding block with increasing grits of sand paper.

    Day late and dollar, seven cents(tax) short, my piints are mute. You've made a very nice knife . Welcome to the addiction.
     
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  9. Rio

    Rio Como un angel JDBA Official Member Knife Maker or Craftsman Brigade Member

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    I have a friend that uses the old fashion stone to grind and he does some nice work, nice knife.
     
    Terrapin83 and Jim L. like this.
  10. Terrapin83

    Terrapin83 Little Member

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    Thanks guys. I got the belt grinder up and working now too, so current and future jobs will be much easier. Still need to upgrade to a 2x72 instead of the old Harbor Freight 4x36, but all in good time. Probably gonna end up building one rather than buying. Prices are a bit steep for me to buy one. But it's nothing a little square tubing and welding can't take care of. Thanks again though. I'm pretty happy with how it turned out.
     
    Jim L. and jimmyjo like this.

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