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Grinding belts

Tinysd Mar 17, 2008

  1. Tinysd

    Tinysd Skull Cracker Brigade Member

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    What brand are you guys using? What grit do you start with? What grit do you finish with?
     
  2. L R Harner

    L R Harner They call me "Butch" Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    60 then 80 grit ceramic belts for my hogging
    then i run gator belts A300 -A45
    then hand sand from there of cork belt to run a high belt finish
    i use a 36 grit belt to shape handles
     
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  3. dfarmerknives

    dfarmerknives Tattoo Man says Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I use a no name 50 and 80 for hogging and finish to 400 (aluminum oxide)and then to polish wheel.
     
  4. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    On Steel

    I start with 36--then 60--then 80--then 120--All Ceramics. (3-M 777F or Equivalent)

    Then 220/240--320--Aluminum Oxide Stiff

    On Stainless I then add a couple of scotchbrites to blend and then to the Buffers.

    On Carbon steels I go right to the buffers with the 320 aluminum Oxide Belts finish.

    On handles--36-- Ceramics for Hogging

    Then 80--120-- 240 then 320-- all Flex Belts.

    Then 15 Micron then 9 micron--then to the buffers.

    I spend about $60,000.00 a year on Abrasives.

    Mike
     
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  5. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    What Mike said, except I keep going after heat treat to 1200 grit. I use 36, 60, 80, 120 before HT, and usually start again at 60 or 80 after HT. I use Norton's best for belts, except for shaping handles where I use the cheapest 36's I can find.
     
  6. Mark Terrell

    Mark Terrell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Only Norton Blaze for me on the hoggers. I start at 36, then move to an 80 for light cleanup.

    After that, I go to the Gator Grits for fine tuning. I start off with a 120 Grit then go to the A65 (the 240) then the A45 (400 grit) and a Trizact 600 after that. Sometimes I'll use the A30 (Gator Grit 600), but it depends on the steel.

    After all that, I go to the buffer and buff it down real well to reveal any residual scratches. Once I've tuned all those out, I go to the buffer again and then to the scotchbrite wheels/belts for the satin.

    I don't really hand sand anything any more. Maybe it's laziness, maybe it's efficiency, I just like this method.

    I do all of that before HT, and after I go through my series of scotchbrites and compounds to get my work finish....

    I've found that by doing all the work before HT, I save about 30% on belts as I don't go through them as fast when grinding on soft steel.


    MT
     
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  7. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    I forgot to add.


    I don't hand sand anything Either.

    No time.
     
  8. J. Neilson

    J. Neilson Caught in the Mosh Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I get all my belts fro Pop's knife supply- http://popsknifesupplies.com/ - I use m 977 ceramics to hog things out before HTing. I start with a 36 grit belt and do about 80% of my blade with that, then clean that up with the same brand in 60 grit then HT. After HT I go back to the 60 grit 3M ceramic. The blade is almost done when I switch belts. For clean up I switch to Klingspor 220, 400, 600 and if I'm feeling fancy I'll use an Awako (or something similar) 800 grit belt. Then I either hand-rub the blade or etch the damascus.
     
  9. L R Harner

    L R Harner They call me "Butch" Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    J i got to get some of the gator belts up to you for that finish work
    no belt thump and all grit size are the same thicknessA300-180-120-65-45 and if they start cutting funny (or not enough )you just dress them like a stone wheel
     
  10. BennytheBlade

    BennytheBlade LUC4 JDBA Official Member Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    I use whatever Mickley tells me to use :jdwink2:
     
  11. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    From the Selection that Tracy carries I think that's a great idea.

    He has pretty much everything you need.

    Mike
     
  12. stephanfowler

    stephanfowler knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    +1 kinda

    when i first got my grinder setup Mickley and i had a long phonecall about what belts to use and so forth


    i settled on:
    Prior to HT
    blaze 36 for hogging
    Norton 120 stiff belts for cleaning up

    Post HT
    FRESH Jflex 120, then Jflex 320, then 400 cork


    then i hand sand and etch
     
  13. BARKER

    BARKER knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I get all my belts from Pop's also. I use 3M ceramics 60 grit then 120 grit, then I go to a Klingspor J flex 220 grit. Then I heat treat. Alfter that I hand sand the flat to 600 grits for a satin finish or 1000 grit if I'm gonna put a mirror finish on it. Then I grind up to 400 grit and finish my grinds with a scotchbite belt and touch up the flats for satin finished. I'll take the grind up to 600 for mirror finish. I use Kilingspor J flex for 400 and 600 grit also. When hand sanding the flats I spray the blade with 409. It works better than anything I've ever seen.
    -John
     
  14. RoadFish

    RoadFish Cathar Knight

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    What speeds do you use for the various belts and how control you speed.
     
  15. J. Neilson

    J. Neilson Caught in the Mosh Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    As fast as possible but, I hear that's not the norm. That's one of the reasons I use the ceramics so I can run the belt at light speed and push with one foot against the wall. Once I get to 220 and higher I only push half as hard.
    :manganr:
     
  16. stephanfowler

    stephanfowler knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Yeah, i learned that from Randal Graham, i thought he was NUTS when he told me the belt speeds he was running.
    But since then I have become much more comfortable with it, i get a lot less heat build up and much cleaner grinds
     
  17. BennytheBlade

    BennytheBlade LUC4 JDBA Official Member Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    Grammar police... pull over.

    Are the ceramic belts the only ones that work well on steel at high speed?
     
  18. BARKER

    BARKER knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    No, they just last longer.
    -John
     
  19. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    I run them Full up too.

    Less heat and we need to put out 50 to 100 knives a day.

    Mike
     
  20. tmik

    tmik Midwest Knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    that may be the best description of power grinding ever...

    When I hog out a knife, I'm full blast all out. When I get half way done, I start to slow it down until at the end, I'm maybe running 1/3 speed protecting grind lines from the sneeze that can ruin your day. I don't use a foot push but maybe I should.

    Friability is the term used to describe how easy it is to break up the abrasive and expose fresh new cutting edges in use. AO is very friable, ceramics are not so much. What may be a great belt for one person or situation is maybe not so much for another. Belts are designed specifically with this in mind. If you have an ceramic belt or engineered abrasive belt that gets dull quicker than you think it should (given all the hype you've heard about how long they last) jam a junk piece of steel into at high speed and spray some grit. Don't strip it clean, but make it a point to break it up a little. It will really make a dull belt sharp. It will also destroy an AO belt in seconds. I have to do this often with Norax belts to get them sharp again as I don't grind very heavy with them.

    I tend to grind thicker steel than most so I start with a 36x Blaze belt. (Most guys start with a 60x or 80x for regular knives or 120x for folders from what I sell.) They are engineered abrasive (ceramic) and magic dust. They are the longest lasting hogger belts I have ever used. I occasionally sharpen them as I mentioned above but only when they are on their last knife or two. Otherwise they stay sharp pretty much their entire life time with me. I then will switch to a 120x Zirc to smear out the 120 grit marks. Norton has come out with a 120x Blaze now ( I had them special ordered and got the first batch awhile ago) and I now use those.
    After that I switch to Norax 100x which Norton will tell you is the same as a 120x but I find it is the same as a 200x grit. Then I stay on Norax until I'm done. I use Norax in 100x, 65x, 35 or 40x, 16x and 5x. By then it's a full mirror and I buff for just a minute or two. I use Klingspor Jflex belts for bolsters, finger grooves and to clean up plunge cuts.

    I think Gator belts are great. I don't sell them but I've used them and they are good belts. Don't stick a sharp edge into them or you will gouge the hell out of them. 3M Regalites are also good. They make these in different friablities. You might try one of each to see what works for you.

    On handles, I will often hand sand down to 800 or 1000 grit after shaping them with a Jflex belt.

    If a guy is going to be frugal and only grinds now and then, I'd go with CZ (Cubic Zirconium or Zirc's) belts. They are around double what an AO belt costs but they will last quite a bit longer when grinding metal.

    For wood, leather, plastic's, micarta, aluminum and things that tend to clog belts, I always use the cheap AO belts. They are usually open bonded (less abrasive coverage) and give the gunk a place to go. I went through several expensive belts before I figured this out.
     

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