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Get it Sharp and Do it Fast.

Jerry Hossom Feb 10, 2007

  1. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Yeah, but that's that S30V crap. Chips easily and doesn't hold an edge worth a damn. :ssmile:
     
  2. BigJim

    BigJim Justabuyer Fucktard

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    So they say.......

    S30V Won't polish.... wrong
    S30V Chips when thin.... Not in my experience
    S30V won't take a REALLY sharp edge.... BS
    S30V not tough at all..... but it is tough enough

    I will say that recent attacks and unfortunate crusades aside the heat treat that Strider specifies for folders has been consistently EXCELLENT.

    My blades have all been first rate all 14 of them.
     
  3. samhain73

    samhain73 I am the who when you call who's there

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    Hey Jim, have you ever hand convexed a recurved knife, especially one with blade marking like the strider stripes? What do you think, am I doomed to either get the belt sander or use the sharpmaker for this sumbitch?
    (I'll probably get the sander, but have to figure out where to put it in an apartment!):cry:
     
  4. BigJim

    BigJim Justabuyer Fucktard

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    Recuves are a pain in the ass. But by useing the edge of the leather hone you can get it done. I have two classes of knife...users where considerations like tiger stripes are not a concern and safe queens where they are.

    I have probably purchased my last recurve and last serated edge. They are not worth the headache.
     
  5. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Enormous member

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    Anyone?... Help?!...:ropeman:
     
  6. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I'm curious why you didn't want to use what I suggested? IF you are using a 2 x 72 machine that changes the sizes but not the types and grits. It does give you the ability to use Norton Norax belts (Tru-Grit) which can take you to 5 microns.
     
  7. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Enormous member

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    Ooh, thanks Jerry... I'll need to look them up on the web!... Cool/nice/sweet!:devilzide
     
  8. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    HOLD ON! I think a better approach if you're primarily focussed on sharpening, with a clearly transparent lust to actually make knives too, is to buy the 1 x 30" sander to start with. The machine will probably cost you less than a 2 x 72" leather belt. Get the belts I selected above and get started sharpening knives for people. As you gain experience, make some money, and feel the need to expand your capabilities, THEN buy the Grizzly. You'll still find the 1 x 30 useful and will probably find it's perfect for stropping.

    It is easier to get used to the smaller sander and for anything up to 12-15" blades it should do fine. For larger blades it will just take a little longer. It's also a more forgiving system. I think I read somewhere the Harbor Freight 1 x 30's were on sale for $29.95. You could be up an running next week and pay for the sander with the kitchen knives from one neighbor. I promise they will be amazed by what you do to their knives.

    HINT: Practice on your own kitchen knives first, but by the time your knives are sharp you'll be a master.
     
  9. bcraw

    bcraw Little member

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    Start with the HF sander

    Horizon Son--

    I've been "power sharpening" for a few months now. I followed Jerry's tutorial to the letter when buying my equipment and starting out and would strongly suggest anyone else do the same.

    I spent a little over $100 total (I bought 2 leather belts and a 9 micron belt too).

    My reasoning was, as Jerry said, his method has been tried and works....for not a lot of money. Changing things means changing the original formula, which may or may not work. We know this way works.

    I've mainly used mine for sharpening my Bark Rivers (which as you know are already convexed) and for convexing a couple folders. With the Barkies I can usually start with the 15 or 9 micron belt and go from there. It takes longer to change belts than do the actual sharpening.

    I'll probably get another HF sander as a backup. I'm a little concerned about the longevity of the little things.
     
  10. samhain73

    samhain73 I am the who when you call who's there

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    Okay you got me!:bwah: I just bought the 29.99 belt sander, and a Leather belt and the 15 Micron SiC belts. I figure I don't really need to grind away any knives I have, so this should be sufficient right Jerry? Oh I didn't buy the white compound as I have a whole block of the green veritas stuff. Is that good enough?
     
  11. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Green will work, but my experience using it for polishing blades has been a tendancy to cause an orange peel effect if you're too aggressive. That may not be an issue with sharpening, I just don't know. And that's really the issue of changing the recommended materials when you first start. You won't know if it's the process or the materials you're using if you have a problem.

    I would recommend getting one each of the aluminum oxide belts because you could easily find a knife that's a little bit out of shape where it will eat the 15 micron belt before you can get it sharp. A coarser belt will help establish a starting point from which you will always know what comes next. There is very little variation between steels using this method. As bcraw said it sometimes takes more time to change belts than it does to sharpen, especially if the blade has been properly sharpened before.

    Bcraw, thanks for postind. It's always good to hear that it works for a number of people. I've not yet encountered anyone who's said, "I can't make this work". A goodly number have said, "WOW!"
     
  12. bcraw

    bcraw Little member

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    For sharpening, as you as you've got at least a little sense and something in the way of balls it's really not that hard. Just take it slow. There's no mystery in it.

    Now, as for stuff more complex than sharpening or convexing an edge...........I've seen Jerry's work and have been to Escanaba and watched the Bark River crew grind knives. There's not much mystery in that either, just a hell of a lot of skill and artistic ability that most of us don't have. It takes more than a tutorial and an HF sander to learn that.

    And Samhain--
    Right now I use the green compound and finish on bare leather, mainly because I already had green compound and would have to have made a completely new order for the white. (I guess I didn't follow the tutorial to the letter) Anyway, it works, but I can see the need for the white and will be ordering some.
    Have fun and good luck.
     
  13. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Let me say something about rules and following a procedure exactly, or nearly so. I do none of those things, but if I did my knives would look quite a bit like other makers' knives. I also didn't have the benefit of the internet, nor was I aware that knifemakers are in general pretty giving on their knowhow. Had I the benefit of those resources, I would no doubt have started with what they knew works, THEN I would have changed it to suit what I wanted to achieve or maybe just to satisfy my own sense of adventure.

    You can certainly do it anyway you want, and it might work even better than what I described. The only problem you have then is that you may now know why it worked so well which is OK, but you certainly won't know what comes next until you've acquired a lot more experience. I've been making knives for 25 years. Only in the past 10-12 years have I been making pretty good knives that I was willing to sell and somebody else was willing to buy. The message there is that you probably don't want to learn the way I learned and spend 13-15 years learning it.

    I seriously recommend baby steps at the beginning as you gain an understanding of how and why the process works as it does, then strike out on your own adventure and kick my ass with the work you're able to turn out.

    OK, end of sermon... :jdwink2:
     
  14. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Enormous member

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    Jerry, I'm at my ends... You suggest with/away from the belt, but Mike suggests 'into' the belt... Or am I confusing grinding with sharpening (probably).....

    .....After some re-thought thinking, I think I'll jump right in with the little guy to get started, then allow 'business' to finance my bigger purchases, thanks for regrounding (no pun intended) my thought proccess...

    :thefinger
     
  15. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Mike and I just do it differently. I'm right; he's wrong. :jdwink2: :deadevil:
     
  16. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Enormous member

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    LOL!...

    Jerry, quick Q...

    According to Ganoksin's website, 1200 grit and 15 micron are the 'same' thing... But in your tutorial, you call for BOTH...???...

    Help me out here; before I invest $$$... I appreciate the feedback!:thefinger
     
  17. Jerry Hossom

    Jerry Hossom knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Oops, you caught me. You could probably make do with either of those. I've used the 15 micron SiC with good results on the 1 x 30.

    Different belts with different abrasives in the same grit size can cut very differently. I've never tried 1200 grit Aluminum Oxide belts because I can't find them for my 2 x 72 grinder. I'd buy both, and I guess that's why I suggested it.
     
  18. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Enormous member

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    Yeah...LOL... Though, via my reading/research, the SiC last a bit longer than the aluminum oxide belts... Sooo, I'd go with the SiC, which I have!:devilzide

    :thefinger
     
  19. bigmark408

    bigmark408 BANNED Fucktard

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    xxxxxxxxxxxxx
     
  20. J. Neilson

    J. Neilson Caught in the Mosh Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Just came across this and I'm glad you put it up Jerry (haven't ready the whole thread, just your opener). I do the same method on my knives. I used to use a buffer for stropping until I started doing the hand-rubbed finishes a couple years back. The belt makes much less work. Great method, try it, you'll almost guaranteed to like it.
    :chuck:
     

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