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Ancient Greek Coins

knifepuppet Jan 23, 2009

  1. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Exactly. The mythology always took a long period to become the final version which could probably be mediocre.

    Thanks for your suggestion about google. Google banned China.
     
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  2. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    Google banned is crazy, sorry. Okay. I see you have a book 'History of Art' from the Oxford press. Oxford makes excellent and accurate books on art. That information should be good. The John Bagnell Bury 'History' is very good but he died in 1927 so it might be somewhat outdated.

    The one with Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel ceiling on the cover - is it about the restoration of the painting or is it a 'History' of art? I'm not familiar with that book. I'm better with pictures than with text - especially if it is Chinese 'text'. lol I am very bad with Chinese. Actually I am nonexistent with Chinese or Greek for that matter.

    Can you follow links that are posted here?

    https://www.britannica.com/topic/Greek-mythology

    http://www.theoi.com/
     
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  3. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Wow, the links are very helpful for learning Greek mythology. Thank you very much!

    They are nice websites, which reminds me of some great ones of coin collection, such as wildwinds.com, acsearch.info.

    In each field interesting to me, like knives, coins, sports, cultures and so on, America as a leader has gone too far to be easily followed for China. Not even close, believe me.

    I have been just happy to find out my son loves some Greek myths as his bedtime stories.

    Thanks again. And please don't be sorry for google ban though I don't wanna talk about it.
     
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  4. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    This is good. Some American museums have searchable online collections. Usually they give dates and a description of individual items. In the description there is sometimes information about how the item was made, etc. Good way to learn about culture.

    The Walters Collection is one of my favorites for antiquities:

    http://art.thewalters.org/

    Search window is in the lower right (on my screen.) Type in Greece, see what they have. :)

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a huge searchable collection. When you find something interesting click on it and you'll get the era and story of the item.

    http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection

    http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search#!/search?material=Coins

    Most large European museums have similar access. Museo del Prado in Spain:

    https://www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/art-works

    Tell me what collection you want to search and I'll find the link. Happy Travels!
     
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  5. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    It always helps me get inner peace when stepping into a museum.

    I think the Metropolitan Art Museum is one of dreamlands in human cultural universe.

    Wow, they are wonderful links you shared there, I appreciate that.

    The pics of Greek coins there are all beautiful. And I guess I especially love electrum ones for they are so unique.
     
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  6. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    Might find some other book ideas here:

    http://www.coincommunity.com/forum/

    The Met is wonderful.
    I saw this jade coin knife. wow - really different from coin knives today




    upload_2017-5-26_6-17-10.png
     
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  7. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    The early electrum during 7th - 6th century BC had been 22k gold. As hard currency around Aegean sea, electrum coins were popular. It is said those early coins were like beans with no image striken on. The following wars in the east Asia Minor between Ionian League and Lydia Empire needed more and more money, so that both sides melted silver or bronze into electrum to increase amount of gold coins in circulation. It is now called inflation I guess. :) Those "gold" beans had soon been abandoned by smart traders. Then electrum coins with nice mark or image were issued by different city-states to guarantee their authenticity and high gold content ( > 70% ).

    I took 2 pics. I guess it is kinda cute coin. It looks more white than those gold beads of the same times because of lower gold content. Any way, I really think that people in Classical Times were pretty honest. :)

    IMG_20170526_111922.jpg IMG_20170526_113903.jpg
    LESBOS, Mytilene. Circa 377-326 BC. EL Hekte (10mm, 2.55 g, 12h). Head of Kabeiros right, wearing pileos; two stars flanking / Head of Persephone right within linear square. https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=246523

    It's said Lesbos was Sappho's homeland.
     
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  8. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Thanks for sharing nice link. Yeah, it looks pretty different. And I guess the main currency in Han Dynasty was bronze coin (Wuzhu coin). When buying steel from mid-Asia, Han would pay gold as int'l money.
     
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  9. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    Last edited: May 27, 2017
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  10. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    Amazing that electrum coins were popular 600 to 700 years BCE: Before the Christian Era. I know Chinese History has something like 6000 years of written history, much longer than western civilizations. I did not know that electrum was a natural occurring metal; a combination of gold and silver <~ which is why it looks paler. I suppose people in Classical Times knew how to separate the metals to make those pure gold 'bean' coins.

    I think people of all times had to contend with some people who were not honest.

    Why are there two stars on the coin with the head of Kabeiros?
     
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  11. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Yeah, he loves those Greek stories. As a 4 year old boy he amazed me by retelling The Fall of Phaeton.

    Meanwhile Richard Scarry has been his favorite. :)

    We spent a lot time together for he considered me a story machine.

    In my fragmentary time I could learn some ancient Greek stuff for our common hobby.

    Thank you for sharing the nice website. And, do you have children? Lotsa stories and travelling together?

    Here I post 2 more pics of another 2 electrum coins of mine, which my boy likes, too. :)

    IMG_20170527_171006.jpg IMG_20170527_171304.jpg

    IONIA, Phokaia. Circa 387-326 BC. EL Hekte – Sixth Stater. Laureate female head left, hair in sakkos; [below, inverted seal right] / Quadripartite incuse square. https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=327574

    IONIA, Phokaia. Circa 478-387 BC. EL Hekte – Sixth Stater (9mm, 2.52 g). Head of young male left, wearing tainia; to right, small seal downward / Quadripartite incuse square. https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=315411

    Those 2 beads are also to compare the color with electrum coins. Bluish-green glass bead with gold cage is from
    republican period of Rome, circa 300 BC. The other bead is from pre-Qin period, circa 300 BC, too.

    It is funny that ancient human shared a common interest in GOLD. :)
     
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  12. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    I guess star(s) on ancient coins basically implied eternity.

    Kabeiros wearing pileos should mean freedom. Is this image saying forever freedom? :)

    I remember there are 2 stars on a famous coin of Rome city establishment. They might also mean good luck I guess.

    bd5a151f7daf9640469dd5768145.jpg
     
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  13. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    I think ancient people shared gold because it was sort of rare and it was beautiful. It didn't tarnish. I would love to see what the world looked like back then. The Rome city establishment coin is awesome. It looks like there is a dinosaur on it. :bwah:
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2017
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  14. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Hahaha, You made my day. Thank you! :thumbup:

    Could a dinosaur milk that 2 kids, Roman would tame her kind and eliminate those northen giants firstly. :):wes:
     
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  15. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    :dinobot3:Yes, knifepuppet, Remus and Romulus were suckled (drink milk from the body) by a dinosaur :bwah: :bwah: I agree the dinosaur definitely helps the narrative.

    And then I looked it up. Excuse me, I am very old and have forgotten much of what I used to know :hairpull::shakie: - for instance:

    " ... in every scenario of this myth, the servant takes pity on the twins and spares their lives. The servant, then, places the twins into a basket onto the River Tiber, and the river carries the boys to safety." It is similar to the story of Moses in the bible.

    ...where they are suckled by a she wolf and fed by a woodpecker bird. This is a good story. :bwah:



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    Last edited: May 28, 2017
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  16. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    Do you access YouTube?

    You probably know all these coins .
     
  17. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Sorry, YouTube banned China, too. I was sick of VPN so that I hadn't used YouTube for years.

    I agree that to find out story behind a coin will bring a little fun to a collector.

    e.g. I don't know why German took this symbol of Rome Establishment as thier own and built a bronze sculpture in Berlin. Today many people in my country think the she wolf suckling Res&Ros was a history of Berlin. As far as Moses concerned, the Bible might be later than Republican period of Rome.
     
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  18. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    Isn't it sad/funny/weird how history gets changed?
    We're not supposed to talk about religion so I won't, it is just interesting how many 'myths' and oral traditional histories contain the same or similar stories as the bible which, as you suggest, might be later than Republican period of Rome; one example would be the Epic of Gilgamesh story of the deluge.

    According to wiki:
    The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from ancient Mesopotamia that is often regarded as the earliest surviving great work of literature. The literary history of Gilgamesh begins with five Sumerian poems about 'Bilgamesh' (Sumerian for 'Gilgamesh'), king of Uruk, dating from the Third Dynasty of Ur (circa 2100 BC). These independent stories were later used as source material for a combined epic. The first surviving version of this combined epic, known as the "Old Babylonian" version, dates to the 18th century BC and is titled after its incipit, Shūtur eli sharrī ("Surpassing All Other Kings"). Only a few tablets of it have survived. The later "Standard" version dates from the 13th to the 10th centuries BC and bears the incipit Sha naqba īmuru ("He who Saw the Deep", in modern terms: "He who Sees the Unknown"). Approximately two thirds of this longer, twelve-tablet version have been recovered. Some of the best copies were discovered in the library ruins of the 7th-century BC Assyrian king Ashurbanipal.

    I read it (in English translation) so long ago I just remember the basics.

    This is a long way from coins. I like your stories of coins better.
     
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  19. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    I guess this is exactly the way human history moves foreward. Names were different, but people were the same. The whole history of people is to settle themselves down and to eliminate those who wouldn't or couldn't. Generations of people will pass, and their cultures will last more or less, in this or that way. We don't have to mind their exact names.

    Here I found out another interesting case on "evolution of art".

    Pantikapaion was founded by Greek (Thracian) colonists from Miletos in the late 7th century BC. Situated on the west side of the Cimmerian Bosporos, in what is now the Crimea, it achieved great prosperity through its exploitation of the abundant fisheries of the Straits and the export of wheat from the Crimea. This wealth is attested by its splendid gold coinage which commenced in the mid-4th century BC and by the magnificently furnished rock tombs of its principal citizens in the same period. Later, it was to become a regional capital of the kingdom of Mithradates VI of Pontos (120-63 BC) and later still the seat of the kings of Bosporos (1st century BC — 4th century AD). The coinage of Pantikapaion seems to have commenced with silver issues in the latter part of the 5th century BC. The choice of design elements for this city's coinage, and the skill of the responsible celators resulted in one of the most attractive and popular of all ancient coin types. The most common motif throughout is the depiction of the head of the god Pan (a pun on the name of the city). It is a striking feature, especially when engraved in a three-quarter facing style, and displays a skill in engraving of the highest merit. The following collection contains a wide variety of metals and denominations, and is reprentative of all periods of coinage from Pantikapaion. ( https://www.cngcoins.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=247 )

    IMG_20170529_161127.jpg
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    IMG_20170529_161204.jpg
    IMG_20170529_161243.jpg
    0001.jpg
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    Anokhin_097.jpg

    0006019014785038_b.jpg

    Da Vinci self portrait looks a little bit old-fashioned, doesn't it? :)
     
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  20. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    More wonderful coins! Your hobby has opened a big door for me. The Da Vinci portrait is only about 500 years old, as you know the coins are a lot older at 2200+ years - but he looks like the faces in the old coins - except the ears haha. Da Vinci was actually very attractive, letters of that time describe him as slender, with regular and aristocratic features. Michelangelo (who did not possess a beautiful face, had a nose pointing to one side from being broken) wrote that Leonardo made him feel inarticulate, and like an ugly squat stone mason. The portrait is old fashioned, I suppose - although I don't see it that way, the hair makes him look old fashioned - It made me wonder when men started using barbers regularly:
    http://thehistoryofthehairsworld.com/barbers_history.html

    I like the 'magnificently furnished rock tombs' of important citizens and would enjoy seeing what they contained. I found this, I wonder if it is a functioning toy or just a representation of the family 'truck'. The front looks like a toy that rolls but I can't figure out where the cotter pin would be on the other piece.

    upload_2017-5-30_6-30-34.png
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2017
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