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Ancient Greek Coins

knifepuppet Jan 23, 2009

  1. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    I found out the ancient Greek coins are very beautiful. Do any devilz collect these things. I hope I can learn something interesting about it. :smalldevil:
     
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  2. HMartin

    HMartin knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I have played around with ancient coins and antiquities for years. Never really got heavily into it, but just picking up items when I found a great deal. You are right, the ancient coins can be very beautiful. I like the Roman stuff also. The symbolism in the Greek and Roman coins in pretty interesting and usually has a good story behind it. Along with coins I have aquired some cool arrow heads, and other bronze items. Fun stuff.
     
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  3. Don Halter

    Don Halter knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    I have about 30 or so Roman, Greek and medieval coins. I've cleaned them, but never taken the time to identify most of them. I also have arrowheads, axeheads and knife blades from 3rd-16th century.

    One of the lab areas I used to inspect at an old job was the nautical archaeology dept at Texas A&M. I learned a lot from them on preservation and treatments of antiquaties.
     
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  4. HMartin

    HMartin knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    Preservation is something a lot of folks don't think about. A couple of years ago, when I was still living on South Padre Island, Tx, I got a call from a friend of mine who was the local museum director. He tells me to come over right away to take a look at a new item. When I get there he has a sea shell encrusted object that looks like a flintlock musket setting on the floor. A couple of surf fishermen snagged it on hook while fishing and brought it to him. I told him it he better get it back in the water or it would start falling apart in no time at all. It spent a couple of days in a bathtub until the state acheologist could come down and verify the find. He said that without the bathtub treatment the thing may have crumbled. It was a flintlock musket after all, and evidence showed that it just broken off of a larger pile of "debris".
     
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  5. ded i

    ded i Friend of The Devil Lady Devil

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    We need some pix here ... please

    :useless:
     
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  6. Bobert

    Bobert Look what I can do!

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    Yeah, what she said!
     
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  7. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Somehow I recalled this thread today, then I decided to respond it for I am really loving ancient Greek coins like always.

    Though several years passed by, I have been still absolutely a newb in the field of ancient Greek cultures and arts, such as its coin shit.

    As for me, the collecting of ancient Greek coins is like to own some micro-sculptures from the Classical Tims of Europe, circa 500 BC to 323 BC or to 30 BC I guess. The cameo on coins (gold, silver or bronze material)can never be a real stature in museums, but their ages and beauty are no less than those large sculptures in museums. I personally prefer those which subjects are of myth or wars. Zeus, Poseidon, Apollo, Athena, Dionysos, Pegasos, Satyrs and so on, are of course great ones, Alexander the Great, bull fighter, Cavalryman attacking, wrestlers are also my favorites. Meanwhile, I couldn't spend a lot on this hobby 'cause the wife and I have a family to raise. my purchases were mainly at CNG and HA, and I prefer the coins certified by NGC.

    What really inspired me was the courage of ancient Greeks to keep their own small city-states independant and to fight for their own freedom. This courgae produced diversity and real arts.

    [​IMG]

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  8. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    I have only one roman coin , I bought it because it was used during the time of Christ . Thought that was a cool reason to own it .
     
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  9. desmodus

    desmodus Arc Sodium Administrator Lady Devil JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    I went to visit my grandparents in Phoenix when I was roughly 16 (it's funny how hard it is to remember). During the visit my grandpa would take me to museums and all such places. Once for lack of anything else to do we saw an arts and crafts such and such thing set up at an American Legion. There were tables of everything these old folks called their hobbies or obsessions. One old guy had cases of old coins but they were far older than any I had ever seen. Some weren't even round. The ones that fascinated me the most were the Greek and Roman variety. They spanned hundreds of years but a great many of them had Caesars profile on them. I have no idea what most of the time line looks like from back them. All I know is I had goosebumps thinking about all of the hands those coins must have gone through to make it to this old guy's table. He let me hold a couple. I've always wished I had taken more interest in old coins or had a relative who was into them. They really are fascinating.
     
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  10. Towelie

    Towelie The JD: Don't Forget To Bring A Towel Brigade Member

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    I've always wanted some Roman coins, but have never pulled the trigger. The last time I looked into buying one was a few years ago, and I believe the cost was around $86 for the one I was looking at. I'll get one eventually. My grandfather introduced me to coin collecting when I was younger. I have nothing but US currency so far. At the last gun show I went to, I bought a Confederate bill.
     
  11. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Here I share 4 pics of one coin I own and its relative story.

    IMG_20170503_181841.jpg 00041.jpg 00031.jpg 0001.jpg


    KINGS of PAEONIA. Patraos. Circa 335-315 BC. AR Tetradrachm. Laureate head of Apollo right / Warrior on horseback riding right, spearing fallen enemy, holding Macedonian shield, to lower right; monogram to left.

    Patraus (Greek Πατράος; 340 BC – 315 BC) was an ancient Paeonian king. He seems to have been Ariston's brother who served as a general to Alexander the Great.

    Ariston (Greek: Ἀρίστων)was a member of the Paionian royal house, possibly brother of Patraus and father of the later king Audoleon. His service with Alexander the Great, like that of Sitalces II and others, helped to ensure the loyalty of his nation to Macedon in the King's absence. From the beginning of the expedition, he commanded the single squadron of Paeonians.

    The land of the Paeonians, originally including the whole Axius (Vardar) River valley and the surrounding areas, in what is now northern Greece, Macedonia, and western Bulgaria. The Paeonians, who were probably of mixed Thraco- Illyrian origin, were weakened by the Persian invasion (490 B.C.), and those tribes living along the Strymon River (in western Bulgaria) fell under Thracian control. The growth of Macedonia forced the remaining Paeonians northward, and in 358 BC they were defeated by Philip II of Macedonia. The native dynasty, however, continued to be highly respected: about 289 BC, King Audoleon received Athenian citizenship, and his daughter married Pyrrhus, king of Epirus. Under the Romans, Paeonia was included in the second and third districts of the province of Macedonia. By AD 400, however, the Paeonians had lost their identity, and Paeonia was merely a geographic term.
     
  12. desmodus

    desmodus Arc Sodium Administrator Lady Devil JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Awesome.
     
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  13. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Here I d like to share my small discovery in headwear on ancient Greek coins, which is not necessarily always correct. :)

    On the obverse side of above-mentioned Paeonian coin, it is a statue of Apollo's (or Helius') laureate head. Laureate head here firstly means peace, then implies the victory and honor eventually belong to Apollo, the god of sun. This coin's reverse side shows an image of battle field in which the Paeonian cavalryman spears a fallen Macedonian hoplite in the past war between 2 States, but the point of this coin's subject is that they are "now" in peace. Laureate head is of the winner of a peaceful competition or cooperation alike in the ancient Olympic Games from 776 BC.

    On the reverse side of the following coin, it shows the cameo of Apollo sitting on omphalus by holding bow and testing arrow. Apollo on this coin is preparing a war and his headwears is a tenia. On the obverse it is tenia head of Antiochus III that seems to tell his point of its subject: "I will be the winner of Diadochi's war". Unfortunately he was not. Those "diadochi" of Alexander the Great were lack of the king's great heart for tolerance and cooperation, I guess. Tenia head on obverse of an ancient Greek coin is basically promising a winner of a happening war.

    003.jpg IMG_20170504_112220.jpg IMG_20170504_112628.jpg

    Today when I was watching TV for an European football game, I could find out some players wearing tenias. Then I couldn't help thinking that they were playing soccer as a war and they must consider themselves as Rambo in the movie First Blood. :)
     
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  14. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Like this:

    01-rambo-tv-show.w529.h529.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
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  15. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    IMG_20170507_161633.jpg IMG_20170507_161737.jpg
     
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  16. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    3810099.jpg

    MACEDON (Roman Protectorate), Republican period. First Meris. Circa 167-149 BC. AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis mint. Diademed and draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder, in the center of a Macedonian shield / Club; monogram and MAKEΔONΩN above, ΠPΩTHΣ and two monograms below; all within oak wreath, thunderbolt to left.

    After the defeat of Perseus at the battle of Pydna in 168 BC, the Romans divided Macedonia into four separate autonomous administrative regions (merides); the first (PRWTES) lay east of the Strymon with its capital at Amphipolis, the second (DEUTERAS) between the Strymon and Axios with its capital at Thessalonica, the third between the Axios and Peneos with its capital at Pella, and the fourth included most of Upper Macedonia with its capital at Heraclea Lynci. Livy informs us that initially all commerce between the regions, exploitation of the silver and gold mines and the importation of salt were forbidden. Almost all the coinage of this period is struck in the name of the first region and runs parallel to the mass coinages of Thasos and Maroneia from about 158 BC. No silver is known from the third and fourth regions, and only a small number of rare tetradrachms from the second region. These four regions only lasted until 148 BC when the country was finally united to constitute a Roman Province and proceeded to issue coins under the authority of its legatus pro praetore.





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    MACEDON, Roman Protectorate. Circa 148-147 BC. AR Tetradrachm. Amphipolis mint. Diademed and draped bust of Artemis right, bow and quiver over shoulder, in the center of a Macedonian shield decorated with seven eight-pointed stars within double crescents, each separated by seven pellets / ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΩΝ, club; above, LEG and hand holding olive branch left; monogram below; all within oak wreath, [thunderbolt to left].

    This type was probably issued immediately following the suppression of Philip VI Andriskos' revolt. As the Romans did not think the Macedonian people had supported Andriskos, they sent a peace embassy, instead of an army of occupation, after his defeat. The Latin legend LEG refers to 'legatio’, an embassy, and the hand holding the olive branch an offer of peace.

    A.M. Burnett published a hoard ("Aesillas: Two new hoards," CH VII) containing a small number of these tetradrachms along with various Athenian new style tetradrachms, Thasos tetradrachms, and Aesillas tetradrachms. Due to the light wear on the LEG ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΩΝ tetradrachms, Burnett concluded that they were struck shortly before Aesillas' issues, a downdating of approximately fifty years. Some numismatists have adopted this proposal (see Crawford, CMRR, pg. 197). It seems more likely, however, that any apparent anomaly in degree of wear can be explained by the possibility that the hoard was assembled over a period of time, a supposition also supported by the other coinage found in the hoard. For example, the Athenian issues span the years 159/8-137/6 BC, and a number of these are also as well preserved as the Macedonian coins. The evidence of this single find is thus inconclusive, and cannot override MacKay's analysis without further confirmation.

    Information in this message, with two pics included, are from www.cngcoins.com. THX.
     
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  17. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    Artemis is one of ancient Greek most venerated goddess.

    I really prefer this image of her on these coins.

    She is phantom of many fine characters.

    It is very impressive that Artemis is a brave, outdoors loving hunter.
     
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  18. desmodus

    desmodus Arc Sodium Administrator Lady Devil JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Thank you got sharing.
     
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  19. knifepuppet

    knifepuppet Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    My pleasure, Ma'am.

    :)
     
  20. Clydetz

    Clydetz Forever straight and true Brigade Member

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    Very interesting thread. I collected coins but never ran across any Greek coins. Did you have to pay an 'arm & a leg' for the 'slabbed' coins? They seem to be in extremely fine shape.
     
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