1. **ATTENTION ALL DEVILS** If you are still having trouble logging in, (Resetting your password should do "the trick") Optimum Online is blocking JD emails for some reason*, OR if you are not technically capable of doing this; use the "Contact Us" form utilizing your current, valid email address. If your email address is 'lost' to you, simply providing some account details will get us on the correct path together. THERE IS NO NEED TO CREATE SECONDARY ACCOUNTS, STOP BEING SO LAZY! YOU WILL BE BANNED! (Yelling/impolite voice implied there for *maximum effect*)
    Dismiss Notice

A Secare, the JD WIP thread...

Stuart Mitchell Mar 15, 2015

  1. Stuart Mitchell

    Stuart Mitchell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

    67
    19
    0
    Or more accurately should I swap a few of the words around in the thread title, so it actually reads... A Secare JD, the WIP thread :devilwag:

    I have a little project on my bench for a member of these here fora, can you guess who?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'll keep you posted :jdwink2:
     
    markandrex likes this.
  2. jjhamilton

    jjhamilton JDBA4L JDBA Official Member

    10,458
    1,318
    113
    Sweet!:devilcorn:
     
  3. ster91b

    ster91b Paloozster! Brigade Member

    2,559
    488
    93
    Nice! Love the JD mark, how is that done?
     
  4. AngelInDisguise

    AngelInDisguise Average member

    97
    28
    0

    [Bit of a whispered voice with a smile..]

    So you'll even etch on a different logo?

    .... the additional 'JD in a circle' stamp certainly adds a new cool factor to the knife.

    Someone's certainly going to enjoy getting that excellent knife out into the wilds.

    I'll be watching. :)
     
  5. Stuart Mitchell

    Stuart Mitchell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

    67
    19
    0
    Cheers folks, the logo is engraved by laser, I outsource all my blade mark engravings these days too, laser is just so, well, good, crisp and clear, defined letters with no fuzzy edges and no surface deformation around the mark, as you can get with a struck mark...

    Equally important is that it is adaptable, you see as part of my blade mark each knife gets it's own unique build/serial number which of course changes with every knife, as well as that these days they get the grade of steel the knife is made from, a while ago I saw a couple change hands over the internet with incorrect information of what the steel was, so that got added from that point...

    I use the Assay Office here in Sheffield for the service...
     
  6. Stuart Mitchell

    Stuart Mitchell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

    67
    19
    0
    I made a bit of progress with the SJD yesterday, sorry for the poor photos, strange happenings were afoot outside... :ropeman:

    I'm not sure how much detail you'd like, last thing I want to do is turn up and start teaching grandmother to suck eggs..!

    With the blade being all prepared as you have seen I'll start with the handling of it, if there's interest later I can work on another blade and photograph the stages...

    First step with the handle then is to glue up the scales/liners, this particular knife is getting black over red G10, traditionally the Secare gets black over orange, the red seemed to suit JD just a little more though...

    Here the scales/liners glued up and rough cut to shape...

    [​IMG]

    From there it's a case of drilling the 10mm tube/fixings holes, that takes place at my old Fobco Star...

    [​IMG]

    With the holes drilled I now have a constant datum, I can dry fit and assemble and disassemble as much as I need...

    With a line marked on the masking tape that is protecting the blade I can dry fit one of the scales and extend that mark to each side of the tang, onto the scale beneath , then remove the scale and using the same arc from the two marks I currently have on the scale, join the dost and I have the front edge of my scale marked on the inside of my scale...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    What I'll do then is cut to that line, grind it to final shape and then use that scale as my guide for the second, with both dry together then grind bout to the same shape/arc...

    [​IMG]

    From there it's a case of grinding the bevels to those front edges, so they don't finish at 90 degrees with the ricasso, this is simply a grinding and finishing stage, being careful not grind any of the length or indeed shape/arc, so when they are finished they are still identically shaped in that area...

    [​IMG]

    Then with all dry together again I can use a fine blade to scribe through the masking tape using the front edges of the scales as my guide...

    [​IMG]

    Then strip it again, remove the tape from under the scales...

    [​IMG]

    From here key the tang, clean with acetone and it's ready for gluing up...

    A bit fiddly this bit but with a fine smear of glue to each side of the tang and using my 10mm holes again as the datums I can assemble all again and clamp it, clean off the excess from the front edges of the scales, I do like to see an excess there, then leave it to set...

    As if my magic...

    [​IMG]

    Then startmaking some G10 dust... :madaddy:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Because of the nature of the Secare, the shape of it's grip, I can't actually fit the tube fixings it will eventually get, it's mechanical fixings, until it's grip is fully shaped and almost even finished, for now I am solely dependant upon that glue holding all together, it does a good job of it too, they see quite a bit of stick in the 'shop from here until they get their tubes, I have dropped a couple too, I have never had one come off at this stage, I have even had to prize one or two off, which is not that easy to do...

    Did I mention strange happenings outside whilst this was taking place indoors?

    Well I'm pretty sure that a Secare, a JD Secare at that, which gets assembled beneath a solar eclipse is one pretty cool thing...

    [​IMG]

    :manganr:
     
  7. Mr.LaBella

    Mr.LaBella ←The № 1 Devil→ Administrator

    77,439
    11,330
    123
    Solar eclipse knife making at its very finest!!!!!! :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

    Keep the energy up, lots of pictures and lots of text. Us mere mortals love it :D :manganr: :devilwag:
     
  8. Stuart Mitchell

    Stuart Mitchell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

    67
    19
    0
    Next stage of course is to make it a little more comfortable, currently that grip is around 1 1/4" thick :devilzeek

    Shaping takes place predominantly here, on a hard rubber contact wheel...

    [​IMG]

    And here, with the belt running on a flat steel platen, both machines running 40g belts for removing the bulk...

    [​IMG]

    I'll start thinning/tapering the front of the scales...

    [​IMG]

    And making the hollow towards the rear...

    [​IMG]

    As well as in general just 'knocking the corners off'...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    At this point I'll switch from the abrasives to nice, fresh 80g but I'll also swap that contact wheel to a more flexible one...

    [​IMG]

    The same again really, this time refining the shape a little more, blending those corners and constantly checking for comfort, feel and symmetry...

    [​IMG]

    Once closer to shape and feel the abrasives swapped for 120g, I'll tend not to use the flat bed at all from about here too...

    [​IMG]

    Satisfied at 120g I'll go here, for guaranteeing that shape and symmetry I have not found anything better...

    [​IMG]

    It starts to look a lot more refined now, still quite rough though, still 120g...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    From here I work through a few different grits, 240g and higher, using the soft contact wheel and the hand method, switching between the two almost constantly as and when I feel I need to, until I arrive at...

    [​IMG]

    All now is to shape and size and it is merely a finishing process, knife vice, Micromesh and water, quite a satisfying process... :manganr:

    [​IMG]

    Until...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It's at this stage that I'd start to finish again, if the grip was getting a polish, as the Secare get a blasted grip though this is as fine (in fact finer) than it needs to be, from here the tubes get fitted, more on that later...

    Cheers all :thumbsup:
     
    Mr.LaBella likes this.
  9. Mpsecare

    Mpsecare Owl Man

    8,802
    1,081
    0
    :unintroduced:
     
    Mr.LaBella and Ronlad like this.
  10. Berkley

    Berkley Ancient Life Form Brigade Member

    2,245
    3,140
    123
    :perfect10:
    :thumbsup:
     
  11. jjhamilton

    jjhamilton JDBA4L JDBA Official Member

    10,458
    1,318
    113
    Nice!
     
  12. ilovekittens

    ilovekittens Sailing the seas of cheese Knife Maker or Craftsman

    2,530
    968
    123
    Nice work, it looks like some of your machines have stood the test of time. If it ain't broke why fix it, right? Keep the pics coming. :thumbsup: ILK
     
  13. Stuart Mitchell

    Stuart Mitchell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

    67
    19
    0
    Cheers folks, much appreciated...

    Yes, the machines are old, my father worked on pretty much all of them before I did, all in good order though as it is more a case or repair than replace, apart from the drill that is, that could do with some attention sometime soon, funny thing is I have three identical but much, much better condition replacements for it now in the 'shop, I know though that until the existing stops doing what I need it to do I'll not be able to find the time to swap one over :devilroll:
     
  14. Stuart Mitchell

    Stuart Mitchell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

    67
    19
    0
    So...

    Next it is time to countersink the 10mm holes and fit the swaged tubes, each hole on both sides gets a deep countersink...

    [​IMG]

    I'll then prepare a couple of tubes, the material I use for this is a 10mm OD seamless 316 SS tube, two sections of it are cut to length and ground to fit, the tube is slightly oversize and so I remove material form the outside of the tube until it is a tight, push fit, this also keys the tube at the same time, when it fits each end of the tube is polished...

    [​IMG]

    Now sat in my 'shop, not seeing much use these days as my working practice and also materials have changed is this...

    [​IMG]

    The saw only gets used as a saw once in a blue moon (or solar eclipse? :manganr:) these days but what it does have is a good, chunky, controllable vice, so I made these...

    [​IMG]

    The domed and conical pieces you see there are hardened and tempered and the 'faces' polished, they fit into the procedure like this...

    [​IMG]

    The tubes are removed, a quick wipe of glue, reinserted and the conical HT'd 'dies' fitted...

    You can see it coming a mile off eh..? :madaddy:

    [​IMG]

    One of the reasons I particularly like this vice, and I have tried a few others, is the control, the feel of the pressure that is being applied at the business end, I'm after just enough but not too much, technical eh...

    [​IMG]

    Then the conical HT'd dies are replaced with the domed ones, there is one of each fitted here so you can see the difference...

    [​IMG]

    The tubes get another squeeze...

    [​IMG]

    The grip is pretty much taken care of now, prep'd for blasting, I might give it another once over just to make sure, that'll be in a short while though...

    From here it is a case of removing that protective tape and get the blade finished, the spine is finished and worked in order to strike a ferro rod and then the edge is whet and stropped to it's polished convex, once all done it is then very carefully masked again, this is when I'll give the handle the once over again, just to make sure all is on order...

    [​IMG]

    Enter stage right the blasting set up, you can also see one of my replacement/spare Fobco drills in there too...

    [​IMG]

    Compressor fired up, knife ready to go...

    [​IMG]

    Then, 15 minutes later or so, handle blasted, masking tape removed and blade cleaned up...

    It was too late in the day for me to get and decent photos when I got finished up yesterday, so until later...

    [​IMG]

    :madaddy:
     
    Ronlad and Mr.LaBella like this.
  15. Stuart Mitchell

    Stuart Mitchell knifemaker Knife Maker or Craftsman

    67
    19
    0
    Here be it, still in need of a sheath, I'll keep you posted on that though too...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. akz92

    akz92 JDBA4L JDBA Official Member

    72
    9
    8
    :chuck:
     
  17. Mpsecare

    Mpsecare Owl Man

    8,802
    1,081
    0
    :owl: :manganr:
     
  18. RazorSharp

    RazorSharp RZRSHRPDVL Brigade Member

    3,735
    1,095
    113
    Damn that's nice, like it a lot! :thumbsup:
     
  19. MTXCraze

    MTXCraze I flip therefore I am JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

    2,040
    521
    123
    Awesome!!:thumbsup:
     
  20. flowerpower0186

    flowerpower0186 Huge member

    166
    12
    18
    Holy shit man. When your handmade, custom knife looks like a production knife, that's when you know you're a BOSS! Whether it's knives, pool cues, yoyos, wallets, or whatever, you can almost always tell the difference between custom made and production made. Most people like the fact that one person has made something by hand and put their blood, sweat, and tears into it. And b/c it was made by one person, they can test it and make sure everything functions exactly how it's supposed to and it's usually a combination of all that, that makes that custom cost a lot more money and generally more sought after.

    However, the downside to that is, (some might not think it's a downside at all) in my experience with different custom goods, no matter what it is, 85% of the time you can tell it's handmade b/c of the lower tolerances in the fit and finish and small differences between two like items and other small things like. We just can't get the high tolerances and the perfect fit and finish like the expensive machines can get every single time. Some might not think that's a bad thing, some might, but either way, your knife looks like it was carved out and made by a damn machine. Its so damn perfect. There's not a whole lot of makers out there that can get the fit and finish on a knife that perfect using their damn hands and power tools. It is obvious that you are a master at your profession. Just seeing this one small WIP makes me want to try and make a knife. I would LOVE to be able to make knives like that. You're the fucking man. I know it's just a fixed blade, but it's just so damn perfect looking.
     

Share This Page