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1920's...???

P. McKinley May 20, 2014

  1. P. McKinley

    P. McKinley knifemaker formerly known as "Dacks" Knife Maker or Craftsman

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    These were found in the eves of my FIL's 150 year old farm house in Pictou County, N.S. George believes these to be his uncle's who was a hunter and spent time on the farm around the early 1920's.

    I just wanted to get some confirmation of age, and possibly some hints on what should be done with these cartridges - store/sell/destroy? Mike, others....???

    Interesting, if anything:

    -Peter

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  2. unreconstructedgordo

    unreconstructedgordo Level: True Devil

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    worth quite a bit on this side of the border. Send those pictures to Gunbroker with a $100 + postage opening bid. You probably should drive it across before mailing as it is Hazmat.:manganr:
     
  3. Mike Grasso

    Mike Grasso "to protect and to serve" Super Moderator Brigade Member

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    They are great trading material at a gun show as stated.
    Each one should net you at least $50, maybe a $100.
    Shotgun shells are hit and miss.

    Leave them be, don't play with them. A light vacuum wrap would be good.
     
  4. Mike Stewart

    Mike Stewart Knife Moderator/Bark River Knife & Tool

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    This for Sure.

    Good Stuff.
     
  5. amen74

    amen74 Down For Life

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    Blast from the past! Very cool. Be careful. :devilzeek

    Love the packaging. Nice find.
     
  6. GEEZER

    GEEZER Beware The Ides of March Brigade Member

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    Very cool.
    If you vacuum bag them, throw some desiccant in there also...
     
  7. waterdogs

    waterdogs Brigade Member Brigade Member

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    I have a bunch of old WWII military-issue steel-cased .45 ACP ammo, headstamped 1943....lacquered on both primer and casemouth, it still shoots fine in my S&W 625. (I checked the bore for any signs of corrosive primers, there were none....no signs of overpressure on the cases either).

    Now I`m wondering if this stuff might be a little too valuable to waste on plinking. Whadda you think ?
     
  8. BenDibble

    BenDibble Resident Mortician JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    It depends: do you want to sell them and buy a lot more standard 230gr ball ammo to shoot more? Or do you want to shoot expensive and antique ammo? :bwah:
     
    Mike Grasso likes this.
  9. JannieBunny

    JannieBunny Huge member Lady Devil

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    You might try writing a polite, succint email to these guys: http://www.cartridgecollectors.org/

    Just briefly tell them your story, attach a few photos of the lot, and ask them for advise. I'm certain that whomever is in charge of responding to email will be thrilled to have direct contact with you -- especially if the cartridges are valuable, rare, or if he or one of his buddies is into collecting those particular specimens.

    Here's an excerpt from their reference page FAQ:

    Is old ammunition valuable?
    Some is worthless, (or almost worthless) and some is very valuable, but most is only worth relatively little. Just as with some stuffed animal toys, certain people will pay hundreds of dollars for certain cartridges, while other people would not want them at any price. "Old" ammunition generally has very low values (probably less than a dollar, and often only a few pennies per cartridge). This is stuff that shooters are reluctant to use, but not yet desired by collectors. "Collectors' cartridges" are probably 50 years or older, and have some feature that appeals to collectors. Values will generally be in the dollar or less range, but quite a few will bring higher prices with values in the $10.00-20.00 range not unusual, and some bringing much more. Grungy, corroded, dented cartridges have the very least value (if any), while bright examples in a sealed box have the highest value. The only sure way to find the value of anything is for a willing buyer and a willing seller to make a deal.

    Should I clean or polish ammunition before selling it to a collector?
    NO, NO , NO!!!! Watch the "Antiques Roadshow" and see what happens to the value of ANY collector item when improperly cleaned. Recommendations for cleaning and care are in our "Guide to Ammunition Collecting"

    Can I mail ammunition?
    NO, NO , NO!!! It is illegal to mail ammunition with a live primer or powder charge in the U.S. mail. You must send it by another means, such as UPS (ground service only). Consult your local UPS office for proper procedures."

    (A few years back, I sold a whole ammo can full of .50 cal. "squeeze salvo" rounds in many different iterations to a collector for about $100 each round!)

    Best,

    J. :ross:
     
  10. falcon125

    falcon125 the express train to mayhem Brigade Member

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    Nice haul.
     
  11. Timberwolf

    Timberwolf Little member

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    JannieBunny gave you some great advice. Take it. :thumbsup:

    As far as the ammo itself, all the stuff without ANY hint of corrosion would be fine to fire, if it wasn't incredibly valuable. Well-kept ammo doesn't go bad. We've fired a few rounds of ammo here and there that was over 100 years old with no problems, but it didn't have any real collector's value.

    Of course, the rest was just too cool to shoot, that stuff stays with the old, neat stuff that should just be preserved because, why not? :)
     
  12. clockwork477

    clockwork477 Huge member

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    From my experience with old ammo is that it's all about the box. Most old ammo collectors kind of fall in the same category as guys who collect old gas signs or vintage advertisement. Perfered is a full box and a unique logo.

    Great find!:thumbsup:
     
  13. RazorSharp

    RazorSharp RZRSHRPDVL Brigade Member

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    Don't destroy it Peter, if it comes to that I'll gladly take it. :jdwink2:



    Edit, awe damn, just saw how old this thread was.
     

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