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On this day, the daily facts thread

zorro Jul 15, 2014

  1. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never forget:


    Today is Wednesday, August 9, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1967 - The First Marine Division launched Operation Cochise in the Que Son valley.

    1974 - U.S. President Nixon resigned the office of President. He was succeeded by Vice President Gerald R. Ford.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  2. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1978, three teenage girls die after their 1973 Ford Pinto is rammed from behind by a van and bursts into flames on an Indiana highway. The fatal crash was one of a series of Pinto accidents that caused a national scandal during the 1970s.
    [​IMG]:panic:

    On this day in 1945, just a day after the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan submits its acquiescence to the Potsdam Conference terms of unconditional surrender, as President Harry S. Truman orders a halt to atomic bombing.
    :surrender:

    In 1981, the severed head of six-year-old Adam Walsh, who disappeared from a shopping mall two weeks earlier, is found in a canal in Vera Beach, Florida.
    Two years later, career criminal Ottis Ellwood Toole, then an inmate at a Raiford, Florida, prison, confessed to Adam’s abduction and murder. However, investigators were unable to locate Adam’s body where Toole claimed to have buried it and without any physical evidence the Florida state attorney couldn’t prosecute the case. Toole died of cirrhosis of the liver and AIDS in 1996 in a Florida prison, where he was on Death Row for another murder.
    On December 16, 2008, the police department in Hollywood, Florida, announced that the case against Toole was strong enough to close the investigation into Adam’s death.
    :fuctupshit:

    A rare collision of three ships in Tampa Bay, Florida, results in a spill of 336,000 gallons of fuel oil on this day in 1993. Fortunately, a combination of favorable weather conditions and preparedness kept the damage to a minimum.
    :shipwrecked:

    In 1821, Missouri enters the Union as the 24th state–and the first located entirely west of the Mississippi River.
    :welcome_02:

    On August 10, 1977, 24-year-old postal employee David Berkowitz is arrested and charged with being the “Son of Sam,” the serial killer who terrorized New York City for more than a year, killing six young people and wounding seven others with a .44-caliber revolver. Because Berkowitz generally targeted attractive young women with long brown hair, hundreds of young women had their hair cut short and dyed blond during the time he terrorized the city. Thousands more simply stayed home at night.
    After his arrest, Berkowitz claimed that demons and a black Labrador retriever owned by a neighbor named Sam had ordered him to commit the killings.
    :mugshot:

    In 1793, after more than two centuries as a royal palace, the Louvre is opened as a public museum in Paris by the French revolutionary government.
    Today, the Louvre’s collection is one of the richest in the world, with artwork and artifacts representative of 11,000 years of human civilization and culture.
    :artgallery:

    On this day in 2003, the United Kingdom records its first-ever temperature over 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Throughout the month, an intense heat wave scorched the European continent, claiming more than 35,000 lives.
    [​IMG]

    On this day in 1984, the action thriller Red Dawn, starring Patrick Swayze, opens in theaters as the first movie to be released with a PG-13 rating. The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which oversees the movie rating system, had announced the new PG-13 category in July of that same year.
    :boobies:

    On this day in 1981, Pete Rose of the Philadelphia Phillies gets the 3,631st hit of his baseball career, breaking Stan Musial’s record for most hits by a National Leaguer. The record-breaking hit came in a game against the St. Louis Cardinals, the team with whom Musial had spent his entire career, and the former hits king was on hand to congratulate Rose.
    :whoop:
     
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  3. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never Forget:


    Today is Thursday, August 10, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1955 - South Vietnam Premier Ngo Dinh Diem announced that he would not enter into negotiations with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) on elections as long as the Communist government controlled Hanoi.

    1964 - U.S. President Johnson signed Public Law 88-408 (the Tonkin Gulf Resolution). This resolution authorized the president "to take all necessary measures" to defend Southeast Asia. The U.S. Senate repealed it on June 24, 1970.

    1972 - North Vietnamese forces blocked Routes 1, 4 and 13 into Saigon.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  4. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1937, a group of federal prisoners classified as “most dangerous” arrives at Alcatraz Island, a 22-acre rocky outcrop situated 1.5 miles offshore in San Francisco Bay. The convicts–the first civilian prisoners to be housed in the new high-security penitentiary–joined a few dozen military prisoners left over from the island’s days as a U.S. military prison.
    [​IMG]

    In 1980, nurse Carol Bundy confesses her connection to the “Sunset Slayer,” the killer who had been murdering and mutilating young women in Hollywood, California, all summer, to co-workers. “I can’t take it anymore. I’m supposed to save lives, not take them,” she reportedly said. Her confession was relayed to police, who immediately arrested Douglas Clark, Bundy’s live-in lover.
    Bundy and Clark met in a North Hollywood bar in January. Clark was a self-described “king of the one-night stands.” But when he met Bundy, he soon discovered that she was willing to assist and indulge in his sick fantasies. Bundy began taking pictures of Clark having sex with children and listening to his desire to kill.
    In June, Clark abducted two teenagers, sexually assaulted them, and then shot them in the head. He dumped their bodies off the freeway and then went home to brag about it to Bundy. Days later, Clark called a friend of his victims’ and told her details about the awful murders while masturbating. Two weeks later, Clark struck again, killing two young women in separate incidents. In the second attack, Clark cut the head off the woman and took it home, insisting that Bundy apply cosmetics to it. Because most of his victims had been abducted from the Sunset Strip in Los Angeles, the press had taken to calling the serial killer the “Sunset Slayer.”
    Clark proved to be more of an influence than Bundy expected. When she blabbed about Clark’s activities to a former boyfriend, she felt compelled to kill the man to make sure that she wasn’t implicated. On August 5, Bundy stabbed John Murray to death and then cut off his head. Within a week, she was tearfully confessing to her fellow nurses.
    During the trial in 1981, Clark tried to pin all of the murders on Bundy, but the jurors found his story hard to believe and sentenced him to die. Bundy attempted an insanity defense, but she eventually pleaded guilty and received a sentence of 52 years-to-life.
    :thechair:

    A hurricane hits the Louisiana coast, killing more than 400 people, on this day in 1856. Isle Derniere, a resort community, was totally submerged by the storm surges.
    :drowning:

    In 1965, in the predominantly black Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, racial tension reaches a breaking point after two white policemen scuffle with a black motorist suspected of drunken driving. A crowd of spectators gathered near the corner of Avalon Boulevard and 116th Street to watch the arrest and soon grew angry by what they believed to be yet another incident of racially motivated abuse by the police. A riot soon began, spurred on by residents of Watts who were embittered after years of economic and political isolation. The rioters eventually ranged over a 50-square-mile area of South Central Los Angeles, looting stores, torching buildings, and beating whites as snipers fired at police and firefighters. Finally, with the assistance of thousands of National Guardsmen, order was restored on August 16.
    :lynchmob:

    On this day in 2014, actor and comedian Robin Williams, who rose to prominence in the late 1970s in the hit TV sitcom “Mork & Mindy” then went on to star in dozens of films, including “Dead Poets Society” (1989), “Mrs. Doubtfire” (1993) and “Good Will Hunting” (1997), is found dead at his home in Tiburon, California, after committing suicide. As a performer, the versatile, inventive Williams was known as both a comic genius with a rapid-fire delivery and talent for impressions, as well as an accomplished dramatic actor who took on a broad range of roles. After his death, it was announced the 63-year-old entertainer had been suffering from severe depression and was in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease.
    :rip:

    Like any style of music, hip hop has roots in other forms, and its evolution was shaped by many different artists, but there’s a case to be made that it came to life precisely on this day in 1973, at a birthday party in the recreation room of an apartment building in the west Bronx, New York City. The location of that birthplace was 1520 Sedgwick Avenue, and the man who presided over that historic party was the birthday girl’s brother, Clive Campbell—better known to history as DJ Kool Herc, founding father of hip hop.
    :50poundboombox:

    On August 11, 1994, the longest work stoppage in major league history begins. Because of the strike, the 1994 World Series was cancelled; it was the first time baseball did not crown a champion in 89 years.
    :strike:
     
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  5. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never Forget


    Today is Friday, August 11, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1967 - U.S. pilots were cleared to bomb road and rail links in the Hanoi-Haiphong area for the first time.

    1970 - South Vietnamese troops took over responsibility for guarding the Cambodian and Laotian borders along most of the South Vietnamese frontier.

    1972 - The last U.S. ground combat unit in South Vietnam left for the United States. This left 43,500 advisors, airmen and support troops in the country.

    1974 - The U.S. Congress reduced military aid to South Vietnam to $700 million.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  6. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never forget:


    Today is Saturday, August 12, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1965 - Henry Cabot Lodge was sworn in as Ambassador to Vietnam.

    1965 - U.S. President Johnson proclaimed that the United States would not continue to fight in Vietnam "if its help were not wanted and requested."


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  7. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1990, fossil hunter Susan Hendrickson discovers three huge bones jutting out of a cliff near Faith, South Dakota. They turn out to be part of the largest-ever Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever discovered, a 65 million-year-old specimen dubbed Sue, after its discoverer.
    [​IMG]

    On August 12, 1964, Charlie Wilson, part of the gang who pulled off the 1963 Great Train Robbery, one of the biggest heists of its kind, escapes from Winson Green Prison in Birmingham, England. Several men broke into the maximum-security facility to free Wilson, who remained on the loose until 1968.
    [​IMG]

    A Russian nuclear submarine sinks to the bottom of the Barents Sea on this day in 2000; all 118 crew members are later found dead. The exact cause of the disaster remains unknown.
    :drowning:

    In 1676, in colonial New England, King Philip’s War effectively comes to an end when Philip, chief of the Wampanoag Indians, is assassinated by a Native American in the service of the English.
    :how:

    On this day in 30 A.D., Cleopatra, queen of Egypt and lover of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, takes her life following the defeat of her forces against Octavian, the future first emperor of Rome.
    [​IMG]

    In 1978, Oakland Raiders free safety Jack Tatum levels New England Patriots wide receiver Darryl Stingley with a helmet-to-helmet hit in a preseason game, leaving Stingley paralyzed for life. Despite the sport’s hard hits and reputation for roughness, this was the first and only time a player was permanently paralyzed as a result of an injury sustained in a National Football League game.
    [​IMG] :sosad:
     
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  8. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1961, shortly after midnight, East German soldiers begin laying down barbed wire and bricks as a barrier between Soviet-controlled East Berlin and the democratic western section of the city.
    Many Berlin residents on that first morning found themselves suddenly cut off from friends or family members in the other half of the city. Led by their mayor, Willi Brandt, West Berliners demonstrated against the wall, as Brandt criticized Western democracies, particularly the United States, for failing to take a stand against it. President John F. Kennedy had earlier said publicly that the United States could only really help West Berliners and West Germans, and that any kind of action on behalf of East Germans would only result in failure.
    The Berlin Wall was one of the most powerful and iconic symbols of the Cold War. In June 1963, Kennedy gave his famous “Ich bin ein Berliner” (“I am a Berliner”) speech in front of the Wall, celebrating the city as a symbol of freedom and democracy in its resistance to tyranny and oppression. The height of the Wall was raised to 10 feet in 1970 in an effort to stop escape attempts, which at that time came almost daily. From 1961 to 1989, a total of 5,000 East Germans escaped; many more tried and failed. High profile shootings of some would-be defectors only intensified the Western world’s hatred of the Wall.
    :banghead:

    On this day in 1878, Kate Bionda, a restaurant owner, dies of yellow fever in Memphis, Tennessee, after a man who had escaped a quarantined steamboat visited her restaurant. The disease spread rapidly and the resulting epidemic emptied the city.
    [​IMG]

    In 1521, after a three-month siege, Spanish forces under Hernán Cortés capture Tenochtitlán, the capital of the Aztec empire. Cortés’ men leveled the city and captured Cuauhtemoc, the Aztec emperor.
    :swordhead::thrust:

    On this day in 1982, the teenage coming-of-age comedy Fast Times at Ridgemont High opens in theaters around the United States. Written by Cameron Crowe and directed by Amy Heckerling, the film follows a year in the life of high school students Stacy (Jennifer Jason Leigh), Linda (Phoebe Cates), Mark (Brian Backer), and Mike (Robert Romanus) and their assorted classmates and teachers. The ensemble cast also featured the (then relatively unknown) future A-list actors Sean Penn, Nicolas Cage, and Forest Whitaker, as well as Judge Reinhold, Eric Stoltz, Ray Walston, and Anthony Edwards.
    [​IMG] I would post that infamous Phoebe Cates pool scene, butt*, we'd end up in UltraHott! :boobies:

    Elvis Presley’s “Hound Dog” (1956) is one of the biggest and most instantly recognizable pop songs in history. It’s a song so closely associated with the King of Rock and Roll, in fact, that many may mistakenly assume that it was a Presley original. In fact, the story of the song that gave Elvis his longest-running #1 hit (11 weeks) in the summer of 1956 began four years earlier, when “Hound Dog” was recorded for the very first time by the rhythm-and-blues singer Ellie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton in Los Angeles, California, on this day in 1952.
    :duckhunt:

    Born on this day in...
    1860: Annie Oakley, one of the greatest female sharpshooters in American history, is born in Patterson Township, Ohio. :hunter:

    1899: Alfred Hitchcock, the macabre master of moviemaking, is born in London. His innovative directing techniques and mastery of suspense made him one of the most popular and influential filmmakers of the 20th century. :tv_scared:

    1926: Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro is born in the Oriente province of eastern Cuba. :vatoloco:

    On this day in 1940, German aircraft begin the bombing of southern England, and the Battle of Britain, which will last until October 31, escalates.
    The Germans called it “the Day of the Eagle,” the first day of the Luftwaffe’s campaign to destroy the RAF, the British Royal Air Force, and knock out British radar stations, in preparation for Operation Sea Lion, the amphibious invasion of Britain. Almost 1,500 German aircraft took off the first day of the air raid, and 45 were shot down. Britain lost 13 fighters in the air and another 47 on the ground. But most important for the future, the Luftwaffe managed to take out only one radar station, on the Isle of Wight, and damage five others. This was considered more trouble than it was worth by Herman Goering, commander of the Luftwaffe, who decided to forgo further targeting of British radar stations because “not one of those attacked so far has been put out of operation.”
    Historians agree that this was a monumental mistake on the part of the Germans. Had Goering and the Luftwaffe persisted in attacking British radar, the RAF would not have been able to get the information necessary to successfully intercept incoming German bombers. “Here, early in the battle, we get a glimpse of fuddled thinking at the highest level in the German camp,” comments historian Peter Fleming. Even the Blitz, the intensive and successive bombing of London that would begin in the last days of the Battle of Britain, could not compensate for such thinking. There would be no Operation Sea Lion. There would be no invasion of Britain. The RAF would not be defeated.
    [​IMG]

    In 1995, former New York Yankees star Mickey Mantle dies of liver cancer at the age of 63. While “The Mick” patrolled center field and batted clean-up between 1951 and 1968, the Yankees won 12 American League pennants and seven World Series championships.
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never forget:


    Today is Sunday, August 13, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1966 - Prince Norodom Sihanouk of Cambodia criticized the U.S. for the attack on Thlock Track.

    1972 - At Long Binh, Communist demolition specialists attacked an ammo dump and destroyed thousands of tons of ammunition.

    1972 - Ex-U.S. Army Captain J.E. Engstrom stated that a military report he helped prepare in 1971 was suppressed and replaced by a "watered-down" version. In the report, it was estimated that 25% of lower-ranking enlisted men in Vietnam were addicted to heroin.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  10. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 2003, a major outage knocked out power across the eastern United States and parts of Canada. Beginning at 4:10 p.m. EDT, 21 power plants shut down in just three minutes. Fifty million people were affected, including residents of New York, Cleveland and Detroit, as well as Toronto and Ottawa, Canada. Although power companies were able to resume some service in as little as two hours, power remained off in other places for more than a day. The outage stopped trains and elevators, and disrupted everything from cellular telephone service to operations at hospitals to traffic at airports. In New York City, it took more than two hours for passengers to be evacuated from stalled subway trains. Small business owners were affected when they lost expensive refrigerated stock. The loss of use of electric water pumps interrupted water service in many areas. There were even some reports of people being stranded mid-ride on amusement park roller coasters. At the New York Stock Exchange and bond market, though, trading was able to continue thanks to backup generators.
    :lightbulb:

    In 1751, Francis Blandy falls into a coma and dies in his home outside London, England. Later that night, Blandy’s daughter Mary offered one of the family’s servants a large sum of money to help her get to France immediately. Mary was forced to flee on her own when he refused, but she was chased down and caught by neighbors who had heard that Blandy had been poisoned.
    The servants in the Blandy home had been suspicious of Mary because the unmarried 26-year-old had been having an affair with William Cranstoun, a penniless man with a wife back in Scotland, against her father’s wishes. Cranstoun was determined to get a piece of the Blandy fortune.
    The couple, frustrated at their inability to touch Mary’s sizeable dowry, decided to find another route to the money. Mary began slipping small amounts of arsenic into her father’s food, slowly poisoning him over a period of months. As Blandy began to suffer from nausea and acute stomach pain, the servants grew suspicious. One found white powder in the bottom of a pan that Mary had used to feed her father. After Blandy eventually died, the cook saw Mary trying to dispose of the white powder and managed to preserve some of it.
    Mary was charged with murder and faced trial at Oxford Assizes in March 1752. Doctors testifying for the prosecution agreed that Francis Blandy had been poisoned with arsenic. But the test they used on the powder was rather unscientific: They heated it and smelled the vapors—which everyone agreed was clearly arsenic. It wasn’t until 40 years later that chemists finally developed true toxicology tests for arsenic. But the jury remained convinced, and Mary was sent to the gallows. She told the executioner, “Do not hang me too high, for the sake of decency.”
    [​IMG] In China, she is known as "Wan Hung Lo". :cheesydevil:

    In 1784, in Kodiak Island, Grigory Shelikhov, a Russian fur trader, founds Three Saints Bay, the first permanent Russian settlement in Alaska.
    :snow:

    It was during their collaboration on 1983’s “Say Say Say” that former Beatle Paul McCartney is said to have advised King of Pop Michael Jackson to invest some of his enormous wealth in music publishing. It was sound financial advice that McCartney may have come to regret giving on this day in 1985, when Michael Jackson purchased the publishing rights to the vast majority of the Beatles’ catalog for $47 million, outbidding McCartney himself.
    :wallet:

    On this day in 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs into law the Social Security Act. Press photographers snapped pictures as FDR, flanked by ranking members of Congress, signed into law the historic act, which guaranteed an income for the unemployed and retirees. FDR commended Congress for what he considered to be a “patriotic” act.
    :shakie:

    In 1994, terrorist Illich Ramirez Sanchez, long known as Carlos the Jackal, is captured in Khartoum, Sudan, by French intelligence agents. Since there was no extradition treaty with Sudan, the French agents sedated and kidnapped Carlos. The Sudanese government, claiming that it had assisted in the arrest, requested that the United States remove their country from its list of nations that sponsor terrorism.
    :mugshot:

    On August 14, 1971, St. Louis Cardinals ace Bob Gibson throws the first no-hitter of his storied career. Gibson’s heroics helped his team sail to an 11-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
    :whoop:
     
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  11. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1969, the Woodstock Music Festival opens on a patch of farmland in White Lake, a hamlet in the upstate New York town of Bethel.
    :hippies:

    In 2006, Mary Winkler, who confessed to fatally shooting her pastor husband Matthew Winkler in his sleep at their church parsonage in Selmer, Tennessee, is released from jail on $750,000 bail. Winkler was later convicted in his killing, but served only a short time in prison.
    On March 22, 2006, church members found 31-year-old Matthew Winkler in his bedroom, dead from a shotgun wound in the back. The well-liked minister had failed to show up for evening services. The following day, Mary Winkler, then 32, was arrested in Alabama, driving her three young daughters in the family’s minivan. Winkler told police she shot her husband following an argument. She remained in prison until August 15, 2006, when she was released on bail.
    During trial, Winkler claimed her husband had abused her physically and sexually. She also maintained the gun had gone off accidentally. The prosecution argued Winkler had become involved in a financial scam and was trying to hide it from her husband. On April 19, 2007, after deliberating for eight hours, a jury found Winkler guilty of voluntary manslaughter. She was sentenced to three years in prison, but the judge ruled she only had to serve 210 days. Winkler received credit for the five months she’d already spent in jail and the judge allowed her to serve the final 60 days in a mental health facility in Tennessee. She was released on August 14, 2007.
    :mugshot:

    Hurricane Alicia forms south of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico on this day in 1983. Three days later, the Texas Gulf Coast is slammed by the storm, causing 21 deaths, thousands of injuries and billions of dollars in damages.
    :twister::drowning:

    In 1057, at the Battle of Lumphanan, King Macbeth of Scotland is slain by Malcolm Canmore, whose father, King Duncan I, was murdered by Macbeth 17 years earlier.
    My name is Malcolm Canmore. You killed my father. Prepare to die! :rapier:

    In 1961, two days after sealing off free passage between East and West Berlin with barbed wire, East German authorities begin building a wall–the Berlin Wall–to permanently close off access to the West. For the next 28 years, the heavily fortified Berlin Wall stood as the most tangible symbol of the Cold War–a literal “iron curtain” dividing Europe.
    :jackhammer:

    On this day in 1979, Apocalypse Now, the acclaimed Vietnam War film directed by Francis Ford Coppola, opens in theaters around the United States.
    The horror... the horror! :musashi:

    On August 15, 1859, Charles Albert Comiskey, namesake of Chicago’s famous Comiskey Park, is born in Chicago, Illinois. Comiskey went on to become the first and only player to later own a team.
    :whoop:
     
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  12. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never forget






    Today is Tuesday, August 15, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1968 - Heavy fighting took place in and around the DMZ. South Vietnamese and U.S. troops attacked a North Vietnamese battallion for seven and a half hours.

    1970 - It was reported by the South Vietnamese that 308 Communist troops had been killed over four days along a coastal strip of the DMZ.

    1971 - North Vietnamese troops captured the South Vietnames marine base at Ba Ho.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  13. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1948, baseball legend George Herman “Babe” Ruth dies from cancer in New York City. For two days following, his body lay in state at the main entrance to Yankee Stadium, and tens of thousands of people stood in line to pay their last respects. He was buried in Hawthorne, New York.
    [​IMG]

    While salmon fishing near the Klondike River in Canada’s Yukon Territory on this day in 1896, George Carmack reportedly spots nuggets of gold in a creek bed. His lucky discovery sparks the last great gold rush in the American West.
    :goldfoilstar:

    A plane crash at Detroit Metropolitan Airport in Michigan kills 156 people on this day in 1987. A four-year-old girl was the sole survivor of the accident, which was caused by pilot error.
    Northwest Flight 255 was headed to California with a stopover in Phoenix when it pulled away from the gate in Detroit. While the DC-9 Super 82 taxied out to the runway, the pilot and co-pilot failed to conduct their pre-flight checks according to procedure and, as a result, the takeoff-warning system was never turned on. Later, there was speculation that the pilots may have been rushing the checks to avoid incoming bad weather.
    A lack of communication between the pilot and co-pilot turned into a deadly mistake when neither extended the wing flaps prior to takeoff. The extended flaps work as a lifting surface on the leading edge of the wings. As the plane rushed down the 6,800-foot runway, it lifted only 40 feet off the ground when it should already have been 600 feet in the air. At the end of the runway, the plane hit lampposts and a rental-car office. The plane then crashed onto a road a half of a mile away. On the Interstate 94 Bridge in Romulus, the plane hit a car and killed both people in the vehicle.
    The fiery crash that ensued killed 154 other people, including Nick Vanos, a center for the NBA’s Phoenix Suns. Remarkably, one person survived the accident, four-year-old Cecelia Cichan of Tempe, Arizona.
    :facepalm:

    In 1972, one year after he survived an abortive coup against his rule, King Hassan II of Morocco nearly perishes when the airliner carrying him back to Rabat was fired on by his own air force. The aircraft braved the brief attack by the Royal Moroccan Air Force, and several members of the force were later court-martialed for their grievous error.
    :snoopy_flies:

    In 1977, popular music icon Elvis Presley dies in Memphis, Tennessee. He was 42. The death of the “King of Rock and Roll” brought legions of mourning fans to Graceland, his mansion in Memphis. Doctors said he died of a heart attack, likely brought on by his addiction to prescription barbiturates.
    :shakeit:

    Five years to the day after half a million rain-soaked hippies grooved and swayed to the psychedelic sounds of the Grateful Dead at Woodstock, four young men from Forest Hills, Queens, took to the stage of an East Village dive bar in jeans, motorcycle jackets and Converse high-tops to launch a two-minute sonic attack on everything those 60s icons stood for. The date was August 16, 1974, the bar was CBGB’s and the band was the Ramones, giving their debut public performance. The rapidly shouted words with which they opened that show and launched the punk-rock revolution were, as they would always be, “One! Two! Three! Four!”
    :Zombie_Rock:

    On August 16, 1920, Cleveland Indians shortstop Ray Chapman is struck in the temple by a ball pitched by Carl Mays of the New York Yankees. He died 12 hours later. This was the first and only death to occur as the result of a pitched ball in major league history.
    :rip:
     
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  14. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never forget

    Today is Wednesday, August 16, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1964 - General Nguyen Khanh ousted Duong Van Minh as South Vietnamese chief of state and installed a new constitution.

    1966 - In Washington, DC, more than 50 people were arrested for disorderly conduct while disrupting hearings by the House Un-American Activities Committee. The committee was investigating Americans that had given aid to the Viet Cong.

    1967 - Senator William Fulbright (Arkansas) attacked U.S. President Johnson's broad interpretation of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. He felt that Johnson was not mandated to conduct the war at the present scale.

    1972 - U.S. fighter-bombers flew 370 air strikes against North Vietnam. It was the highest daily total of the year.

    1972 - Henry Kissenger left Paris to confer with President Thieu and his advisers.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  15. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1969, the grooviest event in music history–the Woodstock Music Festival–draws to a close after three days of peace, love and rock ‘n’ roll in upstate New York.
    :hippies:

    In 1962, East German guards gun down a young man trying to escape across the Berlin Wall into West Berlin and leave him to bleed to death. It was one of the ugliest incidents to take place at one of the ugliest symbols of the Cold War.
    [​IMG]

    In 1984, the serial burglar and rapist known as “the Fox” breaks into a house and physically assaults a girl, her boyfriend and the girl’s brother near the village of Brampton, England. After raping the woman, the attacker proceeded to remove any traces of evidence from both his victim’s body and the surrounding area. The attack turned out to be a part of a crime spree had had begun in the spring of 1984 when a hooded burglar broke into several houses in an area north of London. A few months later, the thief turned to rape.
    Despite the attacker’s efforts, detectives called to the scene near Brampton found fresh tire tracks in a field next to the victim’s home and a tiny flake of yellow paint on a nearby tree. A shotgun that the Fox had stolen from a previous victim was also found, hidden under some leaves. Police staked out the site, hoping that the Fox might return for the gun, but he never did. Fortunately, the paint flake turned out to be an essential clue; apparently, the color had been used only on a single model of a particular car manufacturer, Leyland, and that the car was produced in 1973 and 1974.
    The victims also reported that the Fox had a northern accent. When investigators checked their records, they found more than 3,000 known burglars who were from northern England but had moved south. Detectives sent to investigate each of these men found a man washing a yellow Leyland in front of his house on September 11. Upon closer inspection, they noticed that a bit of paint was missing from the back of the car.
    Malcolm Fairley confessed to the crimes after his arrest and received six life sentences in 1985.
    :cf:

    On this day in 1999, an earthquake in northwestern Turkey kills more than 17,000 people and leaves more than 250,000 homeless. The immense disaster exposed serious problems with government and building contractors in Turkey.
    :shakie:

    In 1943, U.S. General George S. Patton and his 7th Army arrive in Messina several hours before British Field Marshal Bernard L. Montgomery and his 8th Army, winning the unofficial “Race to Messina” and completing the Allied conquest of Sicily.
    [​IMG]

    In 1877, though only a teenager at the time, Billy the Kid wounds an Arizona blacksmith who dies the next day. He was the famous outlaw’s first victim.
    :crybaby:

    In 1978, the Double Eagle II completes the first transatlantic balloon flight when it lands in a barley field near Paris, 137 hours after lifting off from Preque Isle, Maine. The helium-filled balloon was piloted by Ben Abruzzo, Maxie Anderson, and Larry Newman and flew 3,233 miles in the six-day odyssey.
    :whee:

    On August 17, 1933, New York Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig plays in his 1,308th consecutive game, breaking former Yankee Everett Scott’s record for consecutive games played. Gehrig would go on to play in 2,130 games in a row, setting a record that would stand for over half a century.
    :whoop:
     
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  16. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    NEVER FORGET


    Today is Thursday, August 17, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1968 - The U.S. Defense Department reported that 117,000 missions had been flown over North Vietnam since February 1965.

    1973 - The U.S. and Thailand agreed to begin negotiations on U.S. troop reductions in Thailand.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
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  17. crogers

    crogers Magnus advocatus diaboli Brigade Member

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    On this day in 1991, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev is placed under house arrest during a coup by high-ranking members of his own government, military and police forces. The August 1991 coup was carried out by the hardline elements within Gorbachev’s own administration, as well as the heads of the Soviet army and the KGB, or secret police. Detained at his vacation villa in the Crimea, he was placed under house arrest and pressured to give his resignation, which he refused to do. Claiming Gorbachev was ill, the coup leaders, headed by former vice president Gennady Yanayev, declared a state of emergency and attempted to take control of the government.
    Yeltsin and his backers from the Russian parliament then stepped in, calling on the Russian people to strike and protest the coup. When soldiers tried to arrest Yeltsin, they found the way to the parliamentary building blocked by armed and unarmed civilians. Yeltsin himself climbed aboard a tank and spoke through a megaphone, urging the troops not to turn against the people and condemning the coup as a “new reign of terror.” The soldiers backed off, some of them choosing to join the resistance. After thousands took the streets to demonstrate, the coup collapsed after only three days.
    Gorbachev was released and flown to Moscow, but his regime had been dealt a deadly blow. Over the next few months, he dissolved the Communist Party, granted independence to the Baltic states, and proposed a looser, more economics-based federation among the remaining republics. In December 1991, Gorbachev resigned. Yeltsin capitalized on his defeat of the coup, emerging from the rubble of the former Soviet Union as the most powerful figure in Moscow and the leader of the newly formed Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS).
    [​IMG]

    In 1988, The Honorable (?) Gary M. Little shoots himself just hours before the Seattle Post-Intelligencer releases an article accusing him of abusing his power by sexually exploiting juvenile defendants who appeared before him. The front-page article also suggested that he had exploited his teenage students as a teacher in the 1960s and 1970s. The scandal raised questions about the judicial system, because Little had been investigated and disciplined, but the investigations had been kept a secret.
    In 1981, Little’s first year as a judge, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer received a tip about Little’s unusual relations with juvenile defendants. When the reporter investigated the matter, he found that Little, who was working as a volunteer counselor in juvenile court at the time, had been charged with third-degree assault in 1964. He was accused of assaulting a 16-year-old defendant in his apartment, but the charges had been dismissed. The paper never published the story, but it sparked an investigation by deputies working for King County prosecuting attorney Norm Maleng.
    :magestrate::crybaby:

    On this day in 1933, Roman Polanski, the director of such films as Rosemary’s Baby, Chinatown and The Pianist, is born Rajmund Roman Liebling in Paris, France. As a movie director, Polanski has received numerous honors, including an Academy Award; his personal life, however, has been marked by tragedy and controversy.
    :crybaby2:

    In 1590, John White, the governor of the Roanoke Island colony in present-day North Carolina, returns from a supply-trip to England to find the settlement deserted. White and his men found no trace of the 100 or so colonists he left behind, and there was no sign of violence. Among the missing were Ellinor Dare, White’s daughter; and Virginia Dare, White’s granddaughter and the first English child born in America. August 18 was to have been Virginia’s third birthday. The only clue to their mysterious disappearance was the word “CROATOAN” carved into the palisade that had been built around the settlement. White took the letters to mean that the colonists had moved to Croatoan Island, some 50 miles away, but a later search of the island found none of the settlers.
    :milkcarton:

    On this day in 1931, the Yangtze River in China peaks during a horrible flood that kills 3.7 million people directly and indirectly over the next several months. This was perhaps the worst natural disaster of the 20th century.
    Much of the disaster may have been averted if flood-control measures had been followed closely. The Yangtze carries large amounts of sediment, which accumulates in certain areas of the river and must be cleared regularly. However, with much of the area’s resources devoted to civil war at the time, the river was neglected.
    :drowning:

    In 1227, Genghis Khan, the Mongol leader who forged an empire stretching from the east coast of China west to the Aral Sea, dies in camp during a campaign against the Chinese kingdom of Xi Xia. The great Khan, who was over 60 and in failing health, may have succumbed to injuries incurred during a fall from a horse in the previous year.
    [​IMG]:shakie:

    In 1920, The 19th Amendment to the Constitution, guaranteeing women the right to vote, is ratified by Tennessee, giving it the two-thirds majority of state ratification necessary to make it the law of the land. The amendment was the culmination of more than 70 years of struggle by woman suffragists. Its two sections read simply: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex” and “Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”
    :goodjob:

    On August 18, 1992, celebrated Boston Celtics forward Larry Bird retires.
    [​IMG]
     
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  18. begreen61

    begreen61 Deadicated JDBA Official Member Brigade Member

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    Never forget

    Today is Friday, August 18, 2017
    Today in
    Vietnam War History
    1965 - U.S. Marines launched Operation Starlite in the Van Tuong peninsula in Quang Ngai Province. The six-day battle was the first U.S. ground battle of the war and was a resounding victory.

    1966 - The First Australian Task Force (ATF) defeated Viet Cong forces at Long Tan in Phuoc Tuy Province. The ATF killed 245 communists troops while losing only 17.

    1968 - The North Vietnamese and Viet Cong launched an offensive in the south with 19 separate attacks throughout South Vietnam.

    1971 - Australia and New Zealand announced that the end of the year would be the deadline to withdraw their forces from Vietnam.


    Vietnam War Quote
    There is a simple prescription for peace--leave your neighbors alone."
    Secretary of State Dean Rusk, May 22, 1964
     
    Clydetz, Kelper and crogers like this.

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